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Tuesday, June 11
 

8:00am

Registration Opens
Tuesday June 11, 2013 8:00am - 8:30am
Annex Room

8:30am

Breakfast and Keynote (Dani Herro)

Connected Learning: Gaming the System with Meaningful Play
The GLS Playful Learning Summit begins with a keynote by Dani Herro, GLS alumna and Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Learning at Clemson University.


Speaker
avatar for Dani Herro

Dani Herro

Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Learning, Clemson University
I am a former Instructional Technology Administrator and K-12 Technology Resource Teacher. My PhD work at UW-Madison involved studying teen learning using games and Web 2.0 apps. My current research involves writing and studying game and app design curricula in "formal" schooling, and computational thinking practices in teens designing apps. I love working with teachers and kids connecting technology to learning.


Tuesday June 11, 2013 8:30am - 9:45am
Great Hall

10:00am

PLS Workshop AM1: Applied Improv: Team Dynamics from the Stage
Limited Capacity seats available

Add to your schedule to get into the limited slot!

In this workshop participants will be introduced to the rules, play, and philosophy of improvisation, or “improv” as a means of leveraging team work dynamics to improve teaching and learning.  Participants will learn – through active practice – a set of improv “rules” that can have a direct impact upon how we engage with others both at and outside of work settings (like schools, as well as other formal and informal educational settings).  All participants in this workshop will be engaged as active learners, and will be asked to reflect upon how the lessons presented and learned apply to their lives as classroom teachers, educators, and designers of educational experiences.  In addition to an introduction to improv and participation in warm-up exercises, the majority of the workshop will be dedicated to practicing the rules of improv.  Participants are not required to bring computers or mobile devices.

Location:  Old Madison East


Speaker

Tuesday June 11, 2013 10:00am - 12:00pm
Old Madison

10:00am

PLS Workshop AM2: Video Story Problems: Rebooting Math & Science Assessment with Digital Storytelling
Limited Capacity filling up

Add to your schedule to get into the limited slot!

Are you a math or science educator who thinks traditional story problems are often dull and disconnected from students’ everyday experience?  Would you like to offer math and science students more opportunities to learn about real-world challenges and scenarios?  In this workshop participants will create video story problems as one strategy for amplifying curiosity in math and science through investigations of real-world phenomena.  Participants will explore how to create, prototype, and publish video story problems applicable to various K-12 settings by learning about narrative structures, digital storytelling elements, and by building bridges between student learning in the math and science classroom and real-world applications.  Digital video is a unique medium for educators to foster literacy skills with their students, introduce formative assessment methods, and leverage connections among digital literacy, Common Core Standards, and creativity.  Essential to this DIY curricular approach - and this workshop - is the notion that narrative storytelling and playful learning is at the heart of education innovation and new approaches to teaching and learning.  Participants are expected to bring their own computers and mobile devices for shooting and creating video, as well as examples of math and science problems that have worked (or not worked) for generating student engagement.

Location:  Inn Wisconsin East 


Speaker
avatar for Ben Rimes

Ben Rimes

Director of Curriculum & Instructional Technology, Mattawan Consolidated School District
I'm a 30-something guy trying to make the world a better place for educators, one digital story at a time! Playful learning, curiosity, reflection, and student-driven narratives are the mainstays of my pedagogical practice.


Tuesday June 11, 2013 10:00am - 12:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

10:00am

PLS Workshop AM3: Radix in Your Classroom: Implementing a Multiplayer STEM Game
Limited Capacity full

Add to your schedule to get into the limited slot!

From the Education Arcade at MIT comes The Radix Endeavor, a multiplayer online game targeted at improving mathematics and science understandings and engagement in high school students.  In the game, players take on the roles of scientists and mathematicians to explore and explain a virtual game world.  Tasks in the game are designed for a diverse group of learners and emphasize inquiry and exploration.  In this workshop participants will play the game and learn about how it can be implemented in various classroom settings.  The workshop will begin with an overview of the project and detail how in-game tasks are aligned with the Common Core State Standards for math and the Next Generation Science Standards for biology.  Based upon subject area or interest, participants will play through sections of the game.  Following game play and small group discussion, a large group discussion will focus on professional development.  This workshop is most appropriate for high school math and biology teachers, though other educators (technology teachers, department supervisors, etc.) are very welcome to attend. Participants are expected to bring their own computers or tablet.

Location:  Inn Wisconsin West  


Speaker
avatar for Susannah Gordon-Messer

Susannah Gordon-Messer

Education Content Manager, The Education Arcade, MIT
The Radix Endeavor, a multiplayer online game for high school STEM learning. radixendeavor.org
EK

Eric Klopfer

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Dr. Eric Klopfer is Professor and Director of the Scheller Teacher Education Program and The Education Arcade at MIT. Klopfer’s research focuses on the development and use of computer games and simulations for building understanding of science and complex systems. His research explores simulations and games on desktop computers as well as mobile devices like smartphones and tablets. Klopfer’s work combines the construction of new software... Read More →


Tuesday June 11, 2013 10:00am - 12:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

10:00am

PLS Workshop AM4: Reader, Writer, Gamer: Designing Affinity Spaces to Support Student Literacy Achievement
Limited Capacity full

Add to your schedule to get into the limited slot!

Reader, Writer, Gamer invites classroom teachers, librarians and media specialists, technology coordinators, and administrators to explore how affinity spaces can foster student learning in middle school and high school.  In this workshop participants will focus on how affinity spaces can be used to support literacy learning across the secondary curriculum and address the Common Core State Standards.  This workshop has three primary objectives:

1) Enhance participants’ understanding of literacy across the curriculum, drawing on situated and sociocultural perspectives on literacy

2) Investigate how affinity spaces can support content area literacy and implementation of the Common Core State Standards

3) Cultivate a professional learning community of secondary educators and university-based researchers who are interested in designing online affinity spaces, conducting action research, and sharing resources within the education community.

Participants should bring their own computer or tablet.


Speaker
avatar for Jen Scott Curwood

Jen Scott Curwood

Lecturer, English Education and Media Studies, The University of Sydney
avatar for Jayne C. Lammers

Jayne C. Lammers

Assistant professor, University of Rochester
affinity space research; online research methods; videogame and other digital literacies; writing; 21st century learning; adolescent literacies; English teacher preparation
avatar for Alecia Magnifico

Alecia Magnifico

Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Tuesday June 11, 2013 10:00am - 12:00pm
Class of '24

10:00am

PLS Workshop AM5: How Ideas Become Reality: 3D Printing & Modeling in the Classroom with City X Project
Limited Capacity seats available

Add to your schedule to get into the limited slot!

How can educators affordably bring hands-on learning and cutting edge technology to students around the world?  In this workshop participants will learn about the City X Project, an open-education workshop and online game that uses 3D printing, modeling and scanning to empower kids around the world to understand how ideas become reality and how they can participate in that process.  To learn how to facilitate the City X Project in various classroom settings, participants will first design, model, and print a solution for a fictional character in the new capital city of Mars: City X.  The second half of the workshop will feature a feedback and brainstorming session related to classroom implementation and recommendations for change.  Participants will leave knowing how to model and 3D print original ideas using free software.  Participants are required to bring a computer or iPad tablet.

Location:  Old Madison West 



Tuesday June 11, 2013 10:00am - 12:00pm
Old Madison

10:00am

PLS Workshop AM6: Building a Gameful Classroom
Limited Capacity full

Add to your schedule to get into the limited slot!

A gameful classroom uses game design principles to create a better learning experience for students.  Some of the most powerful examples of engagement from video games include freedom of failure, leveling up, and self-paced progression. For educators who want to adopt these values in their classroom, the administrative overhead can be daunting. This workshop will focus on transforming existing syllabi into gameful syllabi with help from veteran gameful classroom designers.  Using software developed by the GLS community, participants will redesign their classroom into a gameful experience complete with an online portal allowing students to submit assignments and track their ongoing progress.  The workshop will start with presentations of existing gameful classrooms and then participants will be given a walkthrough of a gameful learning management system.  Participants will also work in small groups to redesign an existing classroom into a gameful classroom, using point and skill-based metrics as a means to reorganize classes into systems that increase student motivation and participation.  Participants should bring their own computer.


Speaker
avatar for Clayton Ewing

Clayton Ewing

Coral Gables, FL, USA, University of Miami
I'm an educator, developer and game designer.
avatar for Kate Fanelli

Kate Fanelli

math teacher, Beacon Day Treatment
I am a mother, teacher, wife, sister, daughter and friend. I teach high school math in a day treatment center for students with emotional impairment and I created MathLand, a gameful curriculum delivery model for teaching Algebra to my students and students like them. | | As a teacher, I can get pretty excited about new ideas for gameful approaches to teaching, most things related to Nspire technology, collecting and analyzing real world... Read More →
avatar for Lien Tran

Lien Tran

Assistant Professor, University of Miami
Game Design. Social Impact Games. Social Change. Higher Education.


Tuesday June 11, 2013 10:00am - 12:00pm
Tripp Commons

10:00am

PLS Workshop AM7: Evaluating Student Games: From Minecraft to Scratch, How to Assess Game Creation Projects in the Classroom
Limited Capacity full

Add to your schedule to get into the limited slot!

Assessing games is not a refined art with an accepted standard for accurate evaluation. In fact, professional game reviews often face scrutiny from both consumers and developers in regards to game content. Games are a complex amalgamation of various art forms that are assessed across various contexts - from narrative to visuals to audio to interactive experience.  For educators looking to incorporate game-based projects into their curricula, discovering how to evaluate students’ game creations in a manner that is both fair and generative of useful feedback might seem a daunting task.  This workshop provides a foundation for educators to reference when faced with evaluating game projects. Participants will first explore what makes a good game from different perspectives, and then apply these lenses to assess various game types. Discussion will focus on which assessment criteria worked best and in what contexts, with particular attention to games created by students.  This workshop welcomes any educator interested in integrating game-based projects into their classroom or curriculum.  Participants should bring a computer.


Speaker
avatar for Wade Berger

Wade Berger

Graduate Student Research Assistant, University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Emanuel Rosu

Emanuel Rosu

Software Engineering Intern, Games+Learning+Society
CS undergraduate at UW-Madison, passionate about game dev, games research, games as art, and getting kids into technology and game design.


Tuesday June 11, 2013 10:00am - 12:00pm
Profile Room

10:00am

PD Track 1: Rebooting the Classroom: Leveling Up Motivation, Collaboration, and Learning with Gameful Pedagogy [Closed to accepted participants]

*Please note: Rebooting the Classroom: Leveling up Motivation, Collaboration, and Learning with Gameful Pedagogy is for accepted participants only.

Rebooting the Classroom: Leveling up Motivation, Collaboration, and Learning with Gameful Pedagogy is professional development for classroom teachers and coaches ready to harness an interest in games and digital media with student-centered, differentiated, and project-based learning. The only specialized PD track at the GLS Playful Learning Summit facilitated by and for classroom teachers (facilitators Amanda Pratt and Tim Saunders teach high school social studies and elementary general studies, respectively), accepted participants will create their own gameful pedagogies by “rebooting” their classroom teaching through design, play, and assessment. Participants will: design games aligned with content-specific learning goals applicable to digital, hybrid, and analog environments; explore the features of various games and gameful pedagogies as they support powerful learning outcomes; and create debrief and reflection structures that provide formative assessment opportunities across grade levels and disciplines.


Speaker
avatar for Tim Saunders

Tim Saunders

Elementary Teacher, East Grand Rapids Public Schools
Tim is very much interested in applying gameful experiences for elementary students, and has experience crafting games that mashup digital and analog pedagogies. While video games draw a lot of attention right now in the classroom, Tim tends to skew more towards "collaborate play" games that infuse aspects of technology. | | Tim is also a graduate of the Global Program for Technology in Education at the University of Michigan-Flint... Read More →


Tuesday June 11, 2013 10:00am - 5:00pm
Beefeaters

10:00am

PD Track 2: ARIS Summit 2013 [Closed to accepted participants]

*Please note: ARIS Summit 2013 is for accepted participants only.

ARIS is an easy to use and powerful place-based mobile game platform for iOS that has been used in classrooms, museums, after-school workshops and summer institutes to structure exploration and inquiry through play, and to foster creativity problem-solving through game design. With tens of thousands of iPads coming into schools across the country, the ability to create personalized educational games is here!

This PD track brings together a core group of educators who are already using ARIS, in order to share experiences and innovative uses of the platform.  Advanced users will share practical innovations and solutions with each other, and meet with developers to discuss new feature requests and workflows. 


Speaker
avatar for David Gagnon

David Gagnon

Director, Field Day Lab, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I have a sweet spot for directing small design teams to approach big challenges. I like thinking and making real world products that are inspired by all the cool stuff kids like these days. I love seeing other people find themselves by making something new. I also am a bit of a baking addict, still trying to nail the traditional sour dough baguette in a wood fired oven.
avatar for Breanne Litts

Breanne Litts

University of Wisconsin-Madison
I am a Ph.D. student in Curriculum & Instruction with a Digital Media focus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I currently serve as a project assistant for Dr. Erica Halverson on an NSF funded project researching makerspaces and learning through making. Additionally, I am a researcher in the newly founded Mobile Learning Incubator in Academic Technology at UW-Madison. Broadly, my scholarly interests are focused around the intersection of... Read More →


Tuesday June 11, 2013 10:00am - 5:00pm
Main Lounge

12:15pm

Playful Learning Summit Lunch Expo

The Playful Learning Summit lunch exposition will feature speakers from:

 

If you or your organization is interested in participating in the expo please contact GLS Playful Learning Summit chair Remi Holden at remi.holden@gmail.com.

 


Tuesday June 11, 2013 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Great Hall

2:00pm

PLS Workshop PM1: Game and App Design to Teach Computational Thinking in High School
Limited Capacity full

Add to your schedule to get into the limited slot!

Portal 2, Unity, and MIT App Inventor are key components of a 9-week curriculum aligned to computer science standards in order to teach computational thinking. This workshop will demonstrate how to use media platforms, project-based assignments, and assessments to engage high school students as they learn about computer science.  This workshop will survey curricular resources related to game play and app design for interest-based learning aligned with academic standards. The workshop will begin with a sample course overview, followed by two “mini-design” lessons that simulate the scaffolded project students experience using Portal 2 and MIT App Inventor.  The learning objectives of this workshop include:

1) Critically examining the value and practicality of offering game and app design to teach computational thinking in school

2) Understanding how to garner support , write or customize, and implement a game and app-design course integrated with learning goals

3) Considering the tools, resources, gaming platforms and/or online spaces available and appropriate for high school students

4) Using Portal 2 and MIT App inventor to experience a simulated lesson from the perspective of students.

Participants may bring a computer or tablet, though neither is required.


Speaker
avatar for Dani Herro

Dani Herro

Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Learning, Clemson University
I am a former Instructional Technology Administrator and K-12 Technology Resource Teacher. My PhD work at UW-Madison involved studying teen learning using games and Web 2.0 apps. My current research involves writing and studying game and app design curricula in "formal" schooling, and computational thinking practices in teens designing apps. I love working with teachers and kids connecting technology to learning.


Tuesday June 11, 2013 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Class of '24

2:00pm

PLS Workshop PM2: KidShare: An Investigation Into Community Stories
Limited Capacity full

Add to your schedule to get into the limited slot!

Educators interested in community-based learning and the use of digital media are invited to join representatives from the Madison Children’s Museum for this exciting workshop.  The workshop will begin with an introduction to digital story collecting and an overview of some of the free and open source tools available on digital devices.  This will be followed by an investigation activity about place that requires the use of digital tools and a variety of media to document participants’ findings.  The workshop will also provide an opportunity for participants to create short media presentations sharing their findings with the group. The concluding discussion will focus on how to tailor this activity to different locations, institutions, and audiences.  Participants will be exposed to a variety of digital story collecting devices. They will gain an understanding of the media already available on their personal digital devices and will explore how their media can be used as powerful tools for documentation of place.  Participants should bring their own mobile devices or tablets, though iPods will be available as needed.

Location:  Inn Wisconsin East  



Tuesday June 11, 2013 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

2:00pm

PLS Workshop PM3: Game Design Challenge
Limited Capacity full

Add to your schedule to get into the limited slot!

In this workshop, we will introduce game design as a playful method for teaching and learning. Specifically, we will provide a hands-on, interactive design space for attendees to collaborate around solving ill-defined problems. We will work in rapid-prototyping form to create games in just 60-minutes and discuss potential uses of this process for the classroom. Are you up for the challenge?


Speaker
R

rmmartinez

UW-Madison
avatar for John Martin

John Martin

Learning Consultant, UW-Madison
Integrating technology to increase learning in higher education in various roles since 1998, John currently teaches and develops socioculturally-rich teaching and learning practices at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His doctoral research in Curriculum and Instruction broadly considered the learning affordances of video games, and specifically focused on learner-designed place-based mobile games. Drawing on a background and interest in... Read More →


Tuesday June 11, 2013 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Tripp Commons

2:00pm

PLS Workshop PM4: Learn with Portals: STEM Education Through Gaming
Limited Capacity full

Add to your schedule to get into the limited slot!

Portal 2, an award winning video game by Valve Software, has entered the classroom as a popular teaching tool for mathematics, science and game design curricula.  Workshop facilitators and classroom teachers Steve Isaacs and Cameron Pittman have engaged and motivated students with Portal 2 and its accompanying Puzzle Maker world-building tool to teach computational thinking, iterative design processes, and physics.  Co-facilitator Leslie Redd has enabled classroom teachers to utilize Portal 2 for free with their students, and provides an infrastructure for teachers to collaborate in creating meaningful lessons using various games.  In this workshop participants will experience the mechanics and flexibility of Portal 2 and Puzzle Maker, consider lesson plans related to Portal 2, and gain insight about building symbiotic relationships between video game developers and educators.  Recognizing that not all participants will be familiar with video games, participants will be split into two groups: beginning and advanced users.  The beginning user group will focus on understanding game play basics while the advanced users group will focus on Puzzle Maker techniques and applications. At the end of the workshop, participants will gather in content area teams to brainstorm content specific Portal 2 lesson plans, which they will then share with everyone.  Participants are requested to bring a computer and pre-install software before the workshop.  The educational build of Portal 2 and the Puzzle Maker are currently free tools available to educators upon applying at www.teachwithportals.com.

Location:  Inn Wisconsin West  


Speaker
avatar for Steve Isaacs

Steve Isaacs

Teacher, Bernards Township Board of Ed
Steve has been a gamer since the days of Atari and his Apple II+. His parents were initially concerned with how consumed he was with technology. Now they chuckle as he has created a career around his passion. Steve has been teaching Video Game Design and Development for 15 years, starting with his innovative programming at Liberty Corner Computing, the interactive training and gaming center that he and his wife owned and operated for 10 years... Read More →


Tuesday June 11, 2013 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

2:00pm

PLS Workshop PM5: Build Your Own Practomimetic (ARG/RPG) Course
Limited Capacity seats available

Add to your schedule to get into the limited slot!

In this workshop educators (both K-12 and post-secondary) will develop prototypes for their own game-based courses by way of mapping play objectives onto learning objectives.  The workshop will begin by explaining the mechanics of alternate reality games (ARG) and role-playing games (RPG), and will demonstrate to participants how rules align with learning objectives.  Working in small groups, participants will outline and broaden personal game-based instructional goals and ideas.  One module per group will be used to scaffold the creation of a short prompt that will be shared with all members of the workshop.  Participants will be developing original modules (or even courses) where students can play the adventure of their own learning as a quest to save the world.  The final 10-15 minutes of the workshop will involve a mini-presentation showcasing all of the completed prompts in sequence.  Participants should bring a computer or tablet, and a lesson or course outline/syllabus.

Location:  Old Madison East 


Speaker
avatar for Stephen Slota

Stephen Slota

Co-Founder, The Pericles Group, LLC
Steve (@steveslota) is an instructional design specialist and game design scientist at the University of Connecticut Health Center and a co-founder of The Pericles Group, LLC. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Cognition, Instruction, & Learning Technologies and has worked on a variety of game and instructional design projects with organizations including Arizona State University's Center for Games & Impact, Intel Corporation, and... Read More →
avatar for Roger Travis

Roger Travis

Storrs, CT, US, University of Connecticut, and The Pericles Group, LLC
Only connect: ancient epic to video games; teacher to student; gamer to gamer; fan to fan; parent to child; human being to human being.


Tuesday June 11, 2013 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Old Madison

2:00pm

PLS Workshop PM5: Build Your Own Practomimetic (ARG/RPG) Course
Limited Capacity full

Add to your schedule to get into the limited slot!

In this workshop educators (both K-12 and post-secondary) will develop prototypes for their own game-based courses by way of mapping play objectives onto learning objectives.  The workshop will begin by explaining the mechanics of alternate reality games (ARG) and role-playing games (RPG), and will demonstrate to participants how rules align with learning objectives.  Working in small groups, participants will outline and broaden personal game-based instructional goals and ideas.  One module per group will be used to scaffold the creation of a short prompt that will be shared with all members of the workshop.  Participants will be developing original modules (or even courses) where students can play the adventure of their own learning as a quest to save the world.  The final 10-15 minutes of the workshop will involve a mini-presentation showcasing all of the completed prompts in sequence.  Participants should bring a computer or tablet, and a lesson or course outline/syllabus.

Location:  Old Madison East 


Speaker
avatar for Stephen Slota

Stephen Slota

Co-Founder, The Pericles Group, LLC
Steve (@steveslota) is an instructional design specialist and game design scientist at the University of Connecticut Health Center and a co-founder of The Pericles Group, LLC. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Cognition, Instruction, & Learning Technologies and has worked on a variety of game and instructional design projects with organizations including Arizona State University's Center for Games & Impact, Intel Corporation, and... Read More →
avatar for Roger Travis

Roger Travis

Storrs, CT, US, University of Connecticut, and The Pericles Group, LLC
Only connect: ancient epic to video games; teacher to student; gamer to gamer; fan to fan; parent to child; human being to human being.


Tuesday June 11, 2013 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Old Madison

2:00pm

PLS Workshop PM6: Who's Got Game?  Gaming As a Social Justice Issue
Limited Capacity full

Add to your schedule to get into the limited slot!

This workshop will explore the power of game play as a means of creating more equitable learning experiences for English Language Learners (ELLs).  Participants will play, reflect upon, and discuss examples of game-based learning at the intersection of language development, lesson modification, play as motivation, and social justice.  Facilitator Heather Robertson, who engages gaming as a social justice issue through her role as Instructional Resource Teacher in the Madison (WI) Metropolitan School District, will also share videos and other media related to challenges and successes she has experienced over the past year with her third through fifth grade students.  All Playful Learning participants are welcome to sign up for this workshop, though Who’s Got Game may be particularly relevant for elementary school teachers and educators who work with ELLs or in diverse linguistic and cultural settings.  Personal computers, tablets, and mobile devices are encouraged but not required for this workshop.

Location:  Old Madison West  


Speaker
avatar for Heather Robertson

Heather Robertson

Owner & Instructional Coach, Books del Sur & Madison Metropolitan School District
I'm a nerd...and I'm into whatever it takes to engage others in learning with me. Gaming is one of my favorite ways to engage in learning because it's social, fun, and my students love it! My students also engage in learning when they are present so I'm a fan of mindfulness practices which get my body and mind ready. Finally, I've found my students engage when they are interested in the topic or can relate to characters, so through my book... Read More →


Tuesday June 11, 2013 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Old Madison

4:00pm

PL Eval Time!
Fill out an eval form and tell us what you loved/hated about the inaugural GLS Playful Learning Summit!  

(Click the "Check me out!" button above to fill out the eval, or go to bit.ly/plseval.) 

Tuesday June 11, 2013 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Memorial Union

4:30pm

Playful Learning Summit Happy Hour

Come mix and mingle with friends new and old as we celebrate the GLS Playful Learning Summit!  In addition to awesome video games in our arcade, come hang with BrainPOP and learn about GameUp at our Digital Playground.


Tuesday June 11, 2013 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Tripp Commons
 
Wednesday, June 12
 

8:00am

Registration Opens
Wednesday June 12, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Annex Room

9:00am

Breakfast and Keynote (Steve Schoettler)
From Farmville to schools: What can education learn from large scale social games?

 GLS 9.0 will be kicked off properly with comments by David Krakauer, followed by Steve Schoettler's keynote.

Speaker
SS

Steve Schoettler

Steve is an entrepreneur and investor with a passion for using technology to address critical issues in environment and education. As co-founder and first employee of Zynga, Steve created and managed teams providing high scale infrastructure services for analytics, payment processing, virtual currency, and security. In 2011, he left Zynga to found Junyo, with the mission to use data and analytics to improve education. Steve is an active... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2013 9:00am - 10:00am
Great Hall

10:00am

Arcade
Wednesday June 12, 2013 10:00am - 5:00pm
Tripp Commons

10:30am

What Left 4 Dead Can Teach Us About Kids Games

Fireside Chat:
What Left 4 Dead Can Teach Us About Kids Games

This fireside chat challenges designers to explore opportunities for children’s games by delving into their personal media libraries to find new inspiration in casual and hardcore games. Games like Left 4 Dead, Borderlands, Halo, and Plants vs. Zombies are not designed for children under 12, but they present interesting design features and approaches for cooperative play, data collection, and achievements that, when properly framed within child developmental needs, can inspire great kids products. This session will explore multiple “grown-up” games and foster discussion of which of their features can be applied to the design and development of children’s games.

Carla Fisher, Anne Richards, Natalie Golub


Speaker
avatar for Carla Fisher

Carla Fisher

Founder & President, No Crusts Interactive
Carla Engelbrecht Fisher, Ed.D., is a game designer with a data obsession and the founder of No Crusts Interactive. Her work blends progressive educational philosophies, innovative game mechanics, and children’s curricular needs to create engaging interactive entertainment. Under her direction, No Crusts designedWilliamspurrrrg HD (iPad), Sesame Street: Elmo’s Musical Monsterpiece and Sesame... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2013 10:30am - 11:30am
Capitol View

10:30am

Maker Movement

This individual papers session, ”Maker Movement”, will include the following:

Joystick Designs: Middle School Youth Crafting of Game Controllers
While there are many tools for making games, most of these have focused on screen designs leaving aside the potentially rich space of designing tangible game interfaces for learning. This paper reports on the outcomes of a workshop with middle school youth who created game controllers with MaKey MaKey, a tangible construction kit, to interface with their remixed Scratch games. The analyses focus on the design of game interfaces and program codes and indicate that youth mostly replicated common controller designs but varied in their attention to either functionality or aesthetics. An unexpected finding was how these different approaches followed traditional gender lines, with girls more focused on aesthetics and boys more focused on functionality. This pattern was to some extent replicated in the remixes of the Scratch games. In the discussion we address the pedagogical and technological opportunities and challenges of tangible game making for learning.
Veena Vasudevan, Richard Davis, Eunkyoung Lee, Yasmin Kafai

Learning From The Making In Makerspaces
Tinkerers and makers around the globe are meeting and collaborating in makerspaces to create, hack, and innovate with various tools and technologies. Since makerspaces are a new learning environment, there has, thus far, been no study or analysis of how they work, how people participate and what they learn, or why they are so appealing. In this paper, we present preliminary findings of some of the first empirical research on the Maker movement and makerspaces as learning environments. Specifically, we offer two working frameworks for understanding the learning that happens in makerspaces. Given the lack of current research of learning in makerspaces, these offer potentially significant contributions to our understanding of learning more broadly.
Erica Halverson, Kim Sheridan, Lisa Brahms, Breanne Litts, Trevor Owens

Sector67: Making Things and Breaking Things 
Chris Meyer

Erica Halverson, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Erica Rosenfeld Halverson

Erica Rosenfeld Halverson

Professor of Educational Psychology / Curriculum and Instruction, UW Madison
Erica Halverson is a Professor of Curriculum & Instruction at UW-Madison where she studies how people learn in and through the arts. Erica has worked in a range of arts media including theatre, film, radio, digital art, and most recently, in the emerging Maker Movement. In 2016, Erica co-edited the two volume Makeology (Routledge, 2016), the first volumes dedicated to empirical research on making and makerspaces in education. Erica is the... Read More →

Speaker
YK

Yasmin Kafai

University of Pennsylvania
Yasmin Kafai is Professor of Learning Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. She is a researcher, designer, and developer of online communities and tools (ecrafting.org, stitchtfest.org, and scratch.mit.edu) to promote computational participation, crafting, and creativity across K-16. Book publications include Connected Code, Connected Play, The Computer Clubhouse, Textile Messages, and Beyond Barbie and Mortal Kombat. Kafai earned a... Read More →
EL

Eunkyoung Lee

Researcher, KICE
avatar for Breanne Litts

Breanne Litts

University of Wisconsin-Madison
I am a Ph.D. student in Curriculum & Instruction with a Digital Media focus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I currently serve as a project assistant for Dr. Erica Halverson on an NSF funded project researching makerspaces and learning through making. Additionally, I am a researcher in the newly founded Mobile Learning Incubator in Academic Technology at UW-Madison. Broadly, my scholarly interests are focused around the intersection of... Read More →
avatar for Trevor Owens

Trevor Owens

Senior Program Officer, IMLS
Institute of Museum and Library Services


Wednesday June 12, 2013 10:30am - 11:30am
Inn Wisconsin

10:30am

Meta Discussion of the Field

This individual papers session, ”Meta Discussion of the Field”, will include the following:

Meta-Analysis of Digital Games and Learning In Terms of the NRC's Education for Life and Work Outcomes
This meta-analysis synthesizes research in learning in digital games for students in the K-16 grade range. The studies were located in electronic bibliographic databases from Engineering, Computer Science, Medical, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences fields. Learning is defined and categorized broadly in terms of the Cognitive, Intrapersonal, and Interpersonal clusters of 21st century competencies outlined in the NRC's recent report on Education for Life and Work (Pellegrino & Hilton, 2012). In summary, findings from this meta-analysis indicate that compared to non-game instruction, digital games can enhance student learning as measured by cognitive competencies and some intrapersonal competencies. There was also evidence that certain types of game structures may be more/less effective for certain types of outcomes, underscoring the importance of design beyond simple choice of medium when discussing the affordances of digital games for learning.
Douglas Clark, Emily T. Smith, Stephen Killingsworth

Where Have All the (Educational) Games Gone?
With 91% of children ages 2 to 17 playing videogames at home (NPD, 2011), on average of seven hours per week (Woodard & Gridina, 2000), researchers and game developers are increasingly interested in the potential of implementing video games or game-like environments into classrooms (e.g., see Baek, 2008). However, there are many challenges that prevent the implementation of video games in educational settings (Egenfeldt-Nielsen, 2007, p.63), and many educational games that are presented as under development in academic settings do not reach homes or classrooms. Through analysis of survey-based responses provided by educational game developers, producers, and marketers, this paper examines the barriers and difficulties that impede the development and availability of educational games. Findings indicate that the biggest challenge educational game developers face are finding collaborators to ensure subject-area accuracy and learning integrity. We discuss the implications of this and other findings for the educational game community.
Charles Kinzer, Selen Turkay, Dan Hoffman, Chris Vicari, Christian de Luna, Dao Chantes

Building Partnerships for Impact: The Games and Learning Publishing Council. 
Very few game based learning R and D initiatives have successfully crossed over from small scale innovations to sustainable products or scalable models in either formal or informal learning markets. As a result, private sector investors have been reluctant to help capitalize the sector. This has resulted in a funding gap that is constraining the growth of a new ecosystem of game-based learning products and services.  Now entering the second phase of its activities, the Games and Learning Publishing Council, with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, aims to understand the market dynamics and areas of innovation that are ready for scaling within the game-based education field. The Council, which is made up of a multi-sector leadership group of industry, research, philanthropic, policy and practice leaders has  developed analytical tools, national surveys, and periodic reports to help “raise the sector.” The Council’s next phase of activities will include analyses of game-based learning assessments, convening learning institutes for teachers on games, conducting surveys and studies of how teachers use video games, and developing an online resource site that will make research and market information freely available. This session will allow the GLS community to help shape the work of the Council and to hear key perspectives of some of its members. 
Michael Levine


Constance Steinkuehler, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Constance Steinkuehler

Constance Steinkuehler

Co-Director, Associate Professor, GLS, UW-Madison
Constance Steinkuehler is an Associate Professor in Digital Media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and co-directs the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery and chairs their annual GLS Conference. Her research is on cognition and learning in commercial entertainment games and games designed for impact. In 2011-2012, she served as Senior Policy Analyst in the White House Office of... Read More →

Speaker
avatar for Douglas Clark

Douglas Clark

Vanderbilt University
www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jaznkUOW6E | chais 2013 talk (1 hour) | | http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlMfk5rP9yI&feature=youtu.be | cyberlearning summit 2012 talk (10 minutes) | | Doug Clark's research investigates the learning processes through which people come to understand core science concepts. This work focuses primarily on conceptual change, explanation, collaboration, and argumentation. Clark's research often explores these... Read More →
avatar for Michael Levine

Michael Levine

Executive Director, Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop
Michael Levine oversees the Cooney Center’s efforts to catalyze and support research, innovation, and investment in educational media technologies for young children. Prior to joining the Center, Michael served as Vice President of New Media and Executive Director of Education for Asia Society, managing the global nonprofit organization’s interactive media and educational initiatives to promote knowledge and understanding of Asia and other... Read More →
avatar for Christian de Luna

Christian de Luna

Doctoral Student, Teachers College, Columbia University
An aspiring instructional game designer earning a Doctorate in Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. My research focuses on conveying abstract concepts (i.e., depression and relativity) through game-based learning environments. I have a particular interest in designing games that motivate players to continue exploring these topics beyond the game. | | Experienced with user-centric, iterative design processes and conceptual... Read More →
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Emily Tanner- Smith

Research Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University
avatar for Selen Turkay

Selen Turkay

Games 4 Learning Institute


Wednesday June 12, 2013 10:30am - 11:30am
Beefeaters

10:30am

Beyond Badges & Points: Gameful Assessment Systems for Engagement in Formal Education

Symposium:
Beyond Badges & Points: Gameful Assessment Systems for Engagement in Formal Education

This symposium brings together a range of gameful assessment designs at different levels of formal education to explore how gameful design might lead to greater student engagement and improved learning outcomes. We use the term “gameful assessment” to describe assessment frameworks or approaches that employ game design principles to foster student motivation and learning. The symposium examines systems in both K-12 and higher education, and considers both the conceptual underpinnings of these systems and the design space of current tools developed to make it easier for instructors to implement gameful grading systems. Data related to the success (and struggles) of each system will be discussed.

Sebastian Deterding, Kate Fanelli, Lucien Vattel, Tanner Higgen, Katerina Schenke, Lee Sheldon, Clayton Ewing, Barry Fishman, Stephen Aguilar, Caitlin Holman


Speaker
avatar for Stephen J. Aguilar

Stephen J. Aguilar

Ph.D. Candidate, ABD & Visiting Scholar, University of Michigan / UC Irvine
I am an ABD in Education and Psychology at the University of Michigan, and research the design, efficacy, and motivational implications of learning analytics applications. Specifically, I am interested in how representations of achievement influence students' academic motivation and self-regulated learning strategies. My dissertation study focuses on capturing and measuring students' sense-making processes when exposed to potential visualizations... Read More →
avatar for Sebastian Deterding

Sebastian Deterding

Chief Something Something, coding conduct
An aspiring architect in the cathedral of human understanding. Designer and researcher working on playful and gameful design.
avatar for Clayton Ewing

Clayton Ewing

Coral Gables, FL, USA, University of Miami
I'm an educator, developer and game designer.
avatar for Kate Fanelli

Kate Fanelli

math teacher, Beacon Day Treatment
I am a mother, teacher, wife, sister, daughter and friend. I teach high school math in a day treatment center for students with emotional impairment and I created MathLand, a gameful curriculum delivery model for teaching Algebra to my students and students like them. | | As a teacher, I can get pretty excited about new ideas for gameful approaches to teaching, most things related to Nspire technology, collecting and analyzing real world... Read More →
avatar for Barry Fishman

Barry Fishman

Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Gameful learning, GradeCraft, motivation, higher education
CH

Caitlin Holman

Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
LS

Lee Sheldon

Associate Professor, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Associate Professor | | Department of Communication and Media | | Games and Simulation Arts and Sciences | | Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute | | Principal Investigator: Emergent Reality Lab | | Author: Character Development and Storytelling for Games | | Author: The Multiplayer Classroom: Designing Coursework as a Game | | | | Lee Sheldon is a professional game writer and designer, and an Associate Professor in the Games... Read More →
avatar for Lucien Vattel

Lucien Vattel

CEO, GameDesk
Trailblazing education and game development visionary Lucien Vattel is at the forefront of a nationwide crusade to revolutionize learning in the classroom and beyond. As the CEO of the Los Angeles-based interactive curriculum creator and digital publisher GameDesk, Vattel is transforming the traditional school model into a hands-on, digitally-charged ecosystem for students to discover and nourish their greatest gifts, while embracing STEM... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2013 10:30am - 11:30am
Old Madison

10:30am

Designing and Researching Games to Reduce Stereotypes and Biases: A Psychological Approach

Workshop:
Designing and Researching Games to Reduce Stereotypes and Biases: A Psychological Approach

The workshop will give audience members a first-hand perspective on the psychological approach employed by Tiltfactor Laboratory to create and study games to reduce stereotypes and social biases. Participants will play buffalo and Awkward Moment, two card games created by Tiltfactor as part of a National Science Foundation-funded project addressing gender stereotypes in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), and complete sample post-game assessment materials used in recent experimental studies. Following game play, the presenters will provide a thorough debriefing to explain the psychological foundation of the games’ designs, the means by which the games combat stereotypes and bias, and the preliminary results from completed research involving both games. The session will close with a general discussion centering on the challenges and rewards of conducting rigorous, controlled research to test the efficacy of games, as well as the value of utilizing a cross-disciplinary approach to game design and research.

Geoff Kaufman, Mary Flanagan


Speaker
MF

Mary Flanagan

Mary Flanagan is an award winning game designer and author of Critical Play: Radical Game Design (2009, MIT Press). Flanagan pushes the boundaries of medium and genre across writing, visual arts, and design to innovate in these fields with her 'critical play'-centered approach. She researches and creates games at Tiltfactor, the theory/practice laboratory she founded in 2003 directed at social change play. Tiltfactor... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2013 10:30am - 11:30am
Class of '24

11:30am

Delicious Snack Break!
Wednesday June 12, 2013 11:30am - 12:00pm
Great Hall

12:00pm

Dancing (and Wrestling) with Learning Objectives and Game Mechanics

Fireside Chat:
Dancing (and Wrestling) with Learning Objectives and Game Mechanics

Designs for intrinsic learning-game are often created through processes where game mechanics are inspired and built from the learning objectives the game designers want to embody in the play experience. It’s a wonderful process - it sounds straightforward, but in our experience it’s not: Mechanics are built and played, and the play teach the designers new things that lead to looking at the objectives differently, and therefore the mechanics, in a challenging creative cycle. In this Fireside Chat, we’d like to host a lively discussion of practitioners who have been living this structured and improvisational process – telling tall tales, sharing wisdom (and hairy moments) from the work.

Bert Snow, Scot Osterweil, Jason Haas, Alex Chisholm, Dan Roy, Dave McCool, Caitlin Feeley


Speaker
CF

Caitlin Feeley

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
avatar for Jason Haas

Jason Haas

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Jason is a Research Assistant and PhD candidate in The Education Arcade and the Center for Mobile Learning in the MIT Media Lab. He is also an Early Career Scholar at the Harvard Graduate School of Education in the Spencer New Civics Education Program.His research focuses on designing interesting civic, multiplayer experiences (for learning and otherwise) and evaluating them in context. Recent work includes the Jigsaw-based iPad game SANCTUARY... Read More →
DM

David McCool

President, Muzzy Lane Software
avatar for Scot Osterweil

Scot Osterweil

Scot Osterweil is Creative Director of the Education Arcade in the MIT Comparative Media Studies Program. He has designed award-winning games in both academic and commercial environments, focusing on what is authentically playful in challenging academic subjects. Designs include the acclaimed Zoombinis series (math and logic), Vanished: The MIT/Smithsonian Curated Game(environmental science), Labyrinth (math), Kids Survey Network (data and... Read More →
DR

Dan Roy

Founder, Skylight Games LLC


Wednesday June 12, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Capitol View

12:00pm

Cognitive Bias & Interpretive Frames

This individual papers session, ”Cognitive Bias & Interpretive Frames”, will include the following:

Mitigation of Cognitive Bias Through the Use of a Serious Game
Intelligence analysts gather information from a variety of sources, process the information incrementally as it is received, and are under constant pressure for quick and accurate judgments. Heuer (2006) calls this process “a recipe for inaccurate perception” (p. 27). A serious training game (MACBETH) was designed to address and mitigate cognitive biases undermining analysts’ accurate collection and interpretation of intelligence. The IARPA SIRIUS program directed attention to six cognitive biases, two of which are the focus of this study—fundamental attribution error (FAE) and confirmation bias (CB). We will describe an experiment in which 703 participants either played the MACBETH game or engaged in a more traditional learning method, a video describing these three cognitive biases. The results showed that the game was more effective than the video but only under certain conditions. Explicit training methods and repetitive play increased the effectiveness of the game.
Norah Dunbar, Claude Miller, Bradley Adame, Javier Elizondo, Scott Wilson, Stephanie Schartel, Brianna Lane, Abigail Allums Kauffman, Sara Straub, Judee Burgoon, Joseph Valacich, Elena Bessarabova, Matthew Jensen, Jeff Jenkins, Jun Zhang, Dallas Morrison

Revealing how a videogame can change players' implicit racial biases
African American men are underrepresented among faculty in academic science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM). A contributing factor is implicit bias. This study examines whether an active perspective-taking intervention in the form of a videogame can reduce players’ implicit bias against African Americans. Participants in this randomized controlled study have either played a game designed to address implicit bias (experimental condition) or read a narrative based on the game experience (control condition). In both conditions, the participants are intended to take on the role of an African American graduate student. Participants’ level of perspective-taking, empathy, awareness and experience of bias, and implicit bias towards African Americans will be compared across both conditions to understand how gameplay may lead to changes in players’ implicit racial biases.
Belinda Gutierrez, Dennis Ramirez, Sarah Chu, Clem Samson-Samuel, Molly Carnes

Frames at Play: Situated engagement with research ethics games
Scholarship in educational research has argued games are promising learning tools because players take on fictional identities and roles to build new knowledge and skills. Analyzing usability data from a detective game about research ethics called Murky Misconduct, this paper argues that players use situated and overlapping “interactive frames” (Goffman, 1974) to formulate responses to in-game controversies. Drawing on data sourced from “think-aloud” verbal reports, this paper examines the shifting interactive frames that player-testers, who are graduate students in STEM disciplines, take up as they confront in-game controversies related to research ethics.
Benjamin DeVane, Margeaux Johnson, Amy Buhler, Michelle Leonard, Richard Ferdig

Jordan Thevenow-Harrison, Discussant


Discussants
Speaker
avatar for Benjamin DeVane

Benjamin DeVane

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa
Identity & Learning | Computational Thinking | Design & Aesthetics
avatar for Norah E. Dunbar

Norah E. Dunbar

Associate Professor, University of Oklahoma
Professor Dunbar's research interests include interpersonal deception and nonverbal expressions of power and dominance in interpersonal relationships. Methodologically, she uses behavioral observation techniques to examine verbal and nonverbal communication displays. As a member of the OU Center for Applied Social Research, Professor Dunbar is working on several projects including studies on improving deception detection accuracy and reducing... Read More →
avatar for Javier Elizondo

Javier Elizondo

VLE Production Manager, K20 Center
Javier has a long career as producer of educational games working on grants for the US department of Education. His last two games have been published, by Scholastic and Mentor Interactive, the later as a commercial title for the Nintendo DS. He is currently working on a project for the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) as well as a series of educational video games for middle and high school students under the auspices... Read More →
MJ

Margeaux Johnson

Science & Technology Librarian, University of Florida, Marston Science Library
Margeaux Johnson is a Science & Technology Librarian at the University of Florida, where she coordinates information literacy instruction for the sciences and integrates technology into library learning environments. She served as a Co-PI on the NSF ethics in education grant “Gaming Against Plagiarism” (http://blogs.uflib.ufl.edu/gap/) and was a member of the NIH VIVO Collaboration (http://vivoweb.org/). | Margeaux has been a serialized... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Leonard

Michelle Leonard

Environmental Sciences & Natural Resources Librarian, University of Florida
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Technical Director, USC IMGD, Videogame Researcher
avatar for Clem Samson-Samuel

Clem Samson-Samuel

Game Designer/Graduate Student, Games Learning Society Center & Learning Games Network
A graduate student in curriculum and instruction, Clem Samson-Samuel has worked as a game designer for 12 years, including eight years with Raven Software during which he worked on seven triple-A games. Samson-Samuel holds a B.S. in computer science from UW-Madison.
SW

Scott Wilson

Associate Director, K20 Center


Wednesday June 12, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

12:00pm

Gameful Mechanics (Part 1)

This individual papers session, ”Gameful Mechanics”, will include the following:

Exploring Gamification Techniques for Classroom Management
A variety of gamification techniques from the literature are used in two college courses. Some techniques, such as an experience point-based system and leaderboards, proved confusing or frustrating, while other techniques, such as adding a meaningful narrative layer and allowing students to create their own learning paths, engaged students more deeply. In this article, the techniques used and the effects of each are explored and suggestions are provided for instructors considering adding game layers to the classroom.
Scott Nicholson

Leveling-Up: Evolving Game-Inspired University Course Design
The authors examine two iterations of a high-enrollment university political science course that is designed around motivational constructs found in video games. The idea of “leveling-up” is used as a driving metaphor to showcase the fact that both the course and the research design are an iterative process driven by improving and understanding student outcomes. Both the courses—and the research design employed to understand them—have evolved over two academic years, and we demonstrate that positive effects on students’ motivation to engage with coursework (and sense of control) have remained robust across both iterations. The authors also employ social network analysis to understand how student networks form around how students learned to make sense of the grading system from each other.
Stephen Aguilar, Barry Fishman, Caitlin Holman

A Quasi-Experimental Study of Badges, Incentives, & Recognition on Engagement, Understanding, & Achievement in Quest Atlantis
This study in the Quest Atlantis multi-user virtual learning environment explored whether design-based methods and participatory models of assessment and engagement could advance the nagging debate over the consequences of educational incentives. Four classes of sixth-grade students completed a 15-hour ecological sciences curriculum that was rich with feedback and opportunities to improve. Students in two of the matched classes were able to publically display their success, via a physical leader board and virtual badges that they could place on their in-game avatar. These students showed more sophisticated engagement (enlisting more scientific formalisms and doing so more appropriately), significantly larger gains in understanding (on a challenging performance assessment), and larger gains in achievement (on a test of randomly sampled items aligned to targeted content standards); their intrinsic motivation during the game was slightly higher, and motivation for the domain increased slightly more.
Daniel Hickey, Michael Filsecker

Sebastian Deterding, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Sebastian Deterding

Sebastian Deterding

Chief Something Something, coding conduct
An aspiring architect in the cathedral of human understanding. Designer and researcher working on playful and gameful design.

Speaker
avatar for Stephen J. Aguilar

Stephen J. Aguilar

Ph.D. Candidate, ABD & Visiting Scholar, University of Michigan / UC Irvine
I am an ABD in Education and Psychology at the University of Michigan, and research the design, efficacy, and motivational implications of learning analytics applications. Specifically, I am interested in how representations of achievement influence students' academic motivation and self-regulated learning strategies. My dissertation study focuses on capturing and measuring students' sense-making processes when exposed to potential visualizations... Read More →
avatar for Barry Fishman

Barry Fishman

Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Gameful learning, GradeCraft, motivation, higher education
DH

Daniel Hickey

BOOC at IU - Big Open Online Courses
Dan Hickey’s work focuses on "participatory" approaches to assessment, motivation, & credentialing, and work in e-learning, videogames, open learning, & new media contexts. In recent years, strands of work have come together in a framework he calls "Participatory Learning and Assessment." Since 2012, he has directed the Open Badges Design Principles Documentation Project. This project is examining the design principles emerging across the 30... Read More →
CH

Caitlin Holman

Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
avatar for Scott Nicholson

Scott Nicholson

Associate Professor, Syracuse University School of Information Studies
Dr. Scott Nicholson is an Associate Professor at Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies and the Director of the Because Play Matters game lab. His areas of interest include meaningful gamification and the creation of transformative games for informal learning and training through participatory design. Dr. Nicholson is a published board game designer, wrote the book Everyone Plays at the Library, and was the host of the Web video... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Beefeaters

12:00pm

Coffee, conversation, and your future as a games & learning scholar

Informal Gathering:  Coffee, conversation, and your future as a games & learning scholar

Bring your coffee and grab a cushy seat!

Two years ago Moses Wolfenstein engaged the GLS community in a fireside panel discussion considering the development and defense of a games-based dissertation. This informal conversation is designed to pick up where that conversation left off. Now that we’ve successfully defended, what’s next? Although the number of academic programs offering games based studies has dramatically increased in the past decade, positions in the academy identified specifically as gaming and digital media studies are still few and far between. Many recent DML graduates (or soon-to-be graduates) nervously comb job listings trying to navigate the ambiguity in job postings. Those who’ve successfully found that “dream job” realized quickly that there are challenges associated with furthering a DML or games-based agenda within the academy. In addition, many newly minted PhDs have found their passion in the design community and are pursuing a career in industry.

The range of early career opportunities for gaming and digital media scholars is diverse. This conversation has been compiled to engage a group of early career games scholars in informally discussing issues related to games-based careers within and beyond the academy, andjob market positioning in particular. Participants are uniquely positioned to talk about their job hunting and early career experiences. As a result this panel will offer both graduate students and faculty the opportunity to talk about early career issues, pre-graduation preparation and beneficial transition support.

Elizabeth King, Crystle Martin, Dylan Arena, Christopher C. Blakesley, Matthew Boyer, Mark Chen, Benjamin DeVane, Seann Dikkers, Sean C. Duncan, Shree Durga, Deborah Fields, Dani Herro, Barbara Z. Johnson, Jayne Lammers, Alecia Magnifico, David Simkins, Moses Wolfenstein


Speaker
avatar for Dylan Arena

Dylan Arena

Co-founder and Chief Learning Scientist, Kidaptive, Inc.
I'm passionate about learning sciences (especially game-based learning, cognitive science, and developmental psychology), software, statistics, games, rugby, and CrossFit. I'm also pretty stoked about early learning and next-generation assessment (areas in which my startup, Kidaptive, is focused).
avatar for Chris Blakesley

Chris Blakesley

Director, Multimedia & Interactivity, The Jack Welch Management Institute
Designer and researcher of immersive learning environments through the integration of narrative, games and mobile tools. Currently I direct multimedia and interactive initiatives for a 100% Online EMBA program.
avatar for Matthew Boyer

Matthew Boyer

Assistant Professor, Clemson University
assistant professor of digital media & learning in the eugene t. moore school of education at clemson university
avatar for Mark Chen

Mark Chen

Accidental Hero and Layabout, Independent
non-tenure track positions. | life after a PhD. | gaming culture and power/agency in gaming practice. | esoteric gaming practices, workarounds, and hacks. | subversion, representation, margins. | board games.
avatar for Benjamin DeVane

Benjamin DeVane

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa
Identity & Learning | Computational Thinking | Design & Aesthetics
avatar for Seann Dikkers

Seann Dikkers

Education Department Chair, Bethel University
Seann Dikkers is an associate professor of Education at Bethel University. Formerly, Seann served fourteen years as a middle school teacher, high school principal, and researcher. Now he teaches, writes, and works with some amazing colleagues at Bethel. He studies exemplary teaching, learning design, and learning systems. His books include *Real-Time Research*, *Mobile Media Learning I and II*, and *TeacherCraft: Minecraft in the Classroom... Read More →
SD

Sean Duncan

Indiana University, United States of America
avatar for Shree Durga

Shree Durga

Postdoctoral Researcher, Playable Innovative Technologies (PLAIT) Lab, Northeastern University
computational literacy, modding and information analytics, player engagement and learning in games
avatar for Deborah Fields

Deborah Fields

Independent Research Consultant & Temporary Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital technologies in ways that bridge informal and formal learning contexts. She is the co-PI on the Kids' DIY Media Project (kidsdiymedia.com) aimed at identifying and... Read More →
avatar for Dani Herro

Dani Herro

Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Learning, Clemson University
I am a former Instructional Technology Administrator and K-12 Technology Resource Teacher. My PhD work at UW-Madison involved studying teen learning using games and Web 2.0 apps. My current research involves writing and studying game and app design curricula in "formal" schooling, and computational thinking practices in teens designing apps. I love working with teachers and kids connecting technology to learning.
avatar for Barbara Z. Johnson

Barbara Z. Johnson

Academic Technology Director, University of Wisconsin
avatar for Beth King

Beth King

Assistant Professor, Educational Foundations, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
avatar for Jayne C. Lammers

Jayne C. Lammers

Assistant professor, University of Rochester
affinity space research; online research methods; videogame and other digital literacies; writing; 21st century learning; adolescent literacies; English teacher preparation
avatar for Alecia Magnifico

Alecia Magnifico

Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Crystle Martin

Crystle Martin

Researcher, University of California, Irvine
avatar for David Simkins

David Simkins

Assistant Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology
David is fascinated by the potential of games, particularly role playing as a tool for facilitating and encouraging learning. He is also fascinated by the constraints and affordances of different games as tools for learning. Fortunately, he is ale to study games, write about games, teach about games, and make games for non-commercial purposes without starving. He is an assistant professor at RIT's School of Interactive Games and Media, and a... Read More →
avatar for Moses Wolfenstein

Moses Wolfenstein

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin, Extension
Moses has worked in the field of education for over a decade, and has been studying and creating games and other digital media for learning since 2006. He holds a PhD from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis where he worked with his adviser Rich Halverson on games for school leadership. As SeniorInteraction Developer at University of Wisconsin-Extension, Moses works to improve user experiences and... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Main Lounge

12:00pm

Assessing Learning in GLS Games

Symposium:
Assessing Learning in GLS Games

The Games, Learning, and Society (GLS) has developed a multi-level process for measuring game-based learning. The process addresses the play and learning process from beginning (embedding assessment tools into game design, recruiting players, collecting data on players and play) to end (pre-post testing and iterative game design). This session will trace the GLS model of assessing game-based learning and provide participants the opportunity to engage in the process themselves.

Richard Halverson, Meagan Rothschild, Wade Berger, V. Elizabeth Owen, Craig Kasemodel, Becky Torrisi


Speaker
avatar for Wade Berger

Wade Berger

Graduate Student Research Assistant, University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Richard Halverson

Richard Halverson

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I'm a Professor at UW-Madison, and I study how technologies can and do transform teaching and learning in and out of schools. I work with the Wisconsin Collaborative Education Research Network (the Network); the Collaborative Assessment of Leadership for Learning project, and the Games, Learning and Society Research Center.
avatar for Elizabeth Owen

Elizabeth Owen

Director, Learning & Data Science, Age of Learning
Elizabeth Owen holds a PhD in Digital Media (School of Education) from UW-Madison, focused on game-based learning analytics. Currently the Director of Learning and Data Science at Age of Learning, she's committed to optimizing adaptive learning systems through applied machine learning. Previously a researcher and data scientist with GlassLab Games (EA campus), LRNG, and Metacog, her doctoral work is rooted at the Games+Learning+Society Center... Read More →
avatar for Meagan Rothschild

Meagan Rothschild

Early Education Assessment and Design Specialist, WIDA
Kids, play, learning, media, music, general silliness.
avatar for Becky Torrisi

Becky Torrisi

Project Manager, Learning Games Network


Wednesday June 12, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Old Madison

12:00pm

Prototyping fun with Perlenspiel!

Workshop:
Prototyping fun with Perlenspiel!

Perlenspiel is a fun and simple library for programming HTML5 game prototypes, created by Brian Moriarty in 2009. You can have something fun and interesting up and running very quickly in Perlenspiel, and it's easy to iterate when the cycle between imagination, implementation and experimentation is compressed to minutes rather than days or weeks. Workshop attendees are encouraged to bring their own laptop devices and while no prior experience with Perlenspiel is necessary, a modest level of familiarity with programming conventions will help. If you can look at a piece of programming code and say “I get what that’s doing, or would if I stared at it for long enough”, then you can probably do this. We'll look at setting up Perlenspiel, download and look at examples, discuss how to bend learning game design towards Perlenspiel's capabilities, and then sit down and noodle on projects, sharing as we go.

Dan Norton, Arthur Low


Speaker
avatar for Arthur Low

Arthur Low

Engineering Director, Filament Games
"Early on I saw programming as a way to change the world, all that's needed is the right kind of software. I chose to pursue developing and designing educational games in order to inspire and encourage the generations that follow." | | Arthur earned a BS in computer science with a major in Real-Time Interactive Simulation and minor in Mathematics from DigiPen Institute of Technology. While at DigiPen, Arthur worked on a number of low-level... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Class of '24

1:00pm

Lunch
Wednesday June 12, 2013 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Great Hall

2:30pm

Gameful Mechanics (Part 2)

This individual papers session, ”Gameful Mechanics (Part 2)”, will include the following:

Game-like Design Model
The author outlines a proposed game-like design model for teachers to employ when planning courses, units, and lessons. The author calls for teachers to work as designers of experiences and facilitators of learning. The design model consists of three phases: Wonder, Play, and Make. The Wonder phase is centered on inducing cognitive dissonance, defining roles and identities, and starting to unveil the challenge. The Play phase calls for teachers to design experiences that are similar to levels within video games, and that allow students to explore and tinker, while experiencing both challenge and support. The Make phase consists of clearly defining the challenge, setting the conditions for the Make, and a call to share. The paper concludes with additional possibilities and constraints.
Michael Donhost

Effect of Customization on Game Experiences of a Massively Multiplayer Online Game Players
This study investigated the role of customization as function of user control in a Massively Multiplayer Online game (MMO), Lord of the Rings Online. It extends and adds to the studies examining the effects of choice as a vehicle to understanding users’ dynamic relationships with new media. Sixty six participants data were collected over ten hours of gameplay in four sessions to measure the effects of customization on players’ reported experiences. Participants’ game play experience was assessed with Likert Scale questionnaires and semi structured interviews. Results indicate that players who were able to customize various aspect of the game were more engaged in gameplay than those who did not get to customize. Additionally, the customizers' engagement increased as amount of gameplay time increased . The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed within the context of game design and research.
Selen Turkay, Charles Kinzer, Sonam Adinolf

Designing a Game-Inspired Learning Management System
Through the experience of implementing game-inspired grading systems in undergraduate courses at a large university, we found ourselves pushing the boundaries of what was functionally possible in current Learning Management Systems. Simultaneously, students reported difficulty understanding the core requirements of the course ‘game’, recognizing the various pathways available for them to succeed, and assessing their course performance. In response to these articulated needs (and using the classic videogame user dashboard as inspiration) we developed a custom learning management system to better support game-inspired courses and foreground the affordances of gameful course design.
Caitlin Holman, Barry Fishman, Stephen Aguilar 


Sebastian Deterding, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Sebastian Deterding

Sebastian Deterding

Chief Something Something, coding conduct
An aspiring architect in the cathedral of human understanding. Designer and researcher working on playful and gameful design.

Speaker
avatar for Stephen J. Aguilar

Stephen J. Aguilar

Ph.D. Candidate, ABD & Visiting Scholar, University of Michigan / UC Irvine
I am an ABD in Education and Psychology at the University of Michigan, and research the design, efficacy, and motivational implications of learning analytics applications. Specifically, I am interested in how representations of achievement influence students' academic motivation and self-regulated learning strategies. My dissertation study focuses on capturing and measuring students' sense-making processes when exposed to potential visualizations... Read More →
avatar for Barry Fishman

Barry Fishman

Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Gameful learning, GradeCraft, motivation, higher education
CH

Caitlin Holman

Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
avatar for Selen Turkay

Selen Turkay

Games 4 Learning Institute


Wednesday June 12, 2013 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Beefeaters

2:30pm

Micropresentations

These micropresentations will include the following:

Gaming the Schools: Lessons Learned
In this paper we present four guidelines on the use of play and game based approaches in a formal educational setting. These guidelines address issues related to the potential as well as the limitation of educational games, the required competencies of teachers and trainers for using educational games in the classroom, as well as the limitations and requirements of educational game design as well as business development. They represent the results of a sequence of research and development projects performed over a period of six years.
Michael Wagner

TreeBit: a smartphone game with “evolving” pixel art to teach about life through time.
TreeBit is a smartphone game designed to teach young adults about the framework central to all biology; the phylogenetic Tree of Life that shows how all species on Earth are related to one another. Evolution is central to TreeBit and, thus, to the game’s design. Game art “evolves” from level to level with pixel art of increasing complexity. TreeBit has two components, 1) a Tree World framework that showcases the amazing diversity of life and shows the relationships among species and 2) game levels in which a player learns about important events in the history of life and unlocks sections of the Tree World. Each game level has different winning sernaios that unlock different portions of the Tree World, encouraging levels to be re-played for different outcomes. Here, we introduce TreeBit’s concept and learning goals, and detail our early design decisions.
Audrey Aronowsky, Beth Sanzenbacher, Johanna Thompson, Anthony Sixto, Noah Johnson, Ryan George, Edge Quintanilla, Mark Westneat

From New Players to Fervent Hobbyists: BoardGameGeeks Unite!
This is a call for more research on the growing world-wide tabletop gaming phenomenon, which includes sites of rich cultural production, nuanced emerging communities of practice, and examples of the kinds of varied and rich activity we want to see in our designed learning environments. Evidence that tabletop gaming is experiencing a golden age includes the prolific activity found on the website Board Game Geek (http://boardgamegeek.com/). This paper will present some of these activities and make a case for why “The Geek” serves as a mirror to reflect on more traditional educational settings.
Mark Chen

Digital Refugees: What Happens When Your World Ends?
While the closure of virtual worlds has been a relatively rare phenomenon, it is becoming increasingly common. The closure of MMORPGs has an acute effect on the players of that game, with the destruction of community, home, and property giving rise to a profound sense of loss. These players, forced from their homes, often migrate in groups to other worlds and become digital refugees. This phenomenon has received little scholarly attention to date but is of emerging importance as closures become a more regular phenomenon.
Benjamin Tarsa

A Phenomenological Inquiry of Sound Within Educational Games
In what ways does sound affect our experiences of play within software-based educational games? This study takes a phenomenological approach to examine participant descriptions as they played games with and without sound. Three hundred and seventy eight horizons were coded across six interviews, and a rigorous phenomenological methodology was used to distill the horizons to the essences of subjective participant experiences with sound in games. These results reinforce findings from the extant literature on game sound in which sound reinforces critical aspects of game-play. Sound provided a sense of presence in the game environment, by offering participants an entrance into a coherent, immersive experience of gameplay. Sound and visuals cohered to create a unified perceptual experience that resulted in emotional connections with the plight of in-game characters, while the lack of sound left players wanting to learn more about characters they were trying to save.
Jason Rosenblum

On Asymmetric Multiplayer for Learning
This short talk will focus on the value of engineering the interfaces and systems of learning games for the asymmetric distribution of information, control, and more. Games are often viewed as a way around the “one-size-fits-all” classroom, but make similar design choices, ultimately.
Jason Haas

Emotional Graphs with Adapted PANAS Scale as a tool to Measure Emotional Affection within Educational Activities
Positive or negative emotional affection seems to be an important feature in learning efficiency and motivation. To offer a possibility of tracking the emotional affection and compare it across different educational techniques, we developed emotional graphs with adapted PANAS scale as an evaluation tool, and tested it within experimental study comparing game-based learning, life action role-playing and classic lecture. Emotional graphs seem to be a promising tool in educational research; moreover it reveals interesting data about affections important for learning, such as attentiveness, self-assurance and fatigue.
Michaela Buchtova, Cyril Brom, Vit Sisler

Sean Duncan, Moderator


Discussants
SD

Sean Duncan

Indiana University, United States of America

Speaker
avatar for Audrey Aronowsky

Audrey Aronowsky

Program Manager, Field Museum of Natural History
avatar for Michaela Buchtová

Michaela Buchtová

PhD Candidate, Charles University in Prague
avatar for Mark Chen

Mark Chen

Accidental Hero and Layabout, Independent
non-tenure track positions. | life after a PhD. | gaming culture and power/agency in gaming practice. | esoteric gaming practices, workarounds, and hacks. | subversion, representation, margins. | board games.
avatar for Jason Haas

Jason Haas

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Jason is a Research Assistant and PhD candidate in The Education Arcade and the Center for Mobile Learning in the MIT Media Lab. He is also an Early Career Scholar at the Harvard Graduate School of Education in the Spencer New Civics Education Program.His research focuses on designing interesting civic, multiplayer experiences (for learning and otherwise) and evaluating them in context. Recent work includes the Jigsaw-based iPad game SANCTUARY... Read More →
avatar for Edge Quintanilla

Edge Quintanilla

Digital Learning Specialist, The Field Museum
Currently I'm focusing on developing and facilitating digital learning experiences for high schoolers and middle schoolers at The Field Museum. | | So far, I've been using a wide range of digital media to do that; virtual worlds, mobile games, live internet broadcasts into classrooms. I've also co-facilitated programs like “I Dig Science” - a synchronous science-learning program taking place in Second Life, “Digital Planet” - a... Read More →
avatar for Beth Sanzenbacher

Beth Sanzenbacher

Outreach Coordinator, Field Museum of Natural History
Beth is the Outreach Coordinator for the Biodiversity Synthesis Center at the Field Museum of Natural History. She develops, implements, manages and evaluates select digital media programs and games, and participates in learning science research for the Museum’s Collection and Research Departments and the Encyclopedia of Life (eol.org). | | Through digital media programs she has combined her two passions of science and education, and... Read More →
AS

Anthony Sixto

Anthony Sixto is a Chicago based professional artist who works as a 3D and 2D artist in games, apps and animation. Independently he works on political cartoons, comics and films with a focus on cultural sociology. His goal is not only to master his art but to find a space to create entertaining content that also carries a strong sense of social commentary.
BT

Benjamin Tarsa

Gay RDU
Award-winning Haiku poet and Graduate Student
MG

Michael G Wagner

Drexel University
http://about.me/michaelgwagner


Wednesday June 12, 2013 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Inn Wisconsin

2:30pm

Blazing New Ground in Informal Education: Integrating Mobile Augmented Reality Games in Unlikely Places

Symposium:
Blazing New Ground in Informal Education: Integrating Mobile Augmented Reality Games in Unlikely Places

Informal learning institutions are seeking new ways to integrate mobile technologies which offer visitors unique educational experiences. One way to do this is with augmented reality (AR) software, which allows players to use location-aware smartphones to play games featuring a digital overlay within a real-world context. AR experiences can highlight and contextualize ideas, while personalizing the visitor experience. This panel discussion features three distinct informal learning institutions (a wildlife sanctuary/working farm, a living history museum, and a botanical garden) each of whom recently developed and piloted its own AR game using TaleBlazer (an augmented reality authoring toolkit for iOS and Android smartphones). The panel session will include a brief overview of TaleBlazer, case studies of the pilot projects developed by each institution, and dialogue between panelists and the audience on the unique challenges of integrating AR in unlikely informal learning places.

Judy Perry, Bob Coulter, Renata Pomponi, Kris Scopinich, Rhys Simmons


Speaker
avatar for Bob Coulter

Bob Coulter

Director, Litzsinger Road Ecology Center (Missouri Botanical Garden)
I spend most of my time thinking about ways to get kids excited about learning and taking action in the community. A good part of this involves games they design with MIT's Taleblazer and StarLogo Nova tools, or in playing Equations, a really cool math game.
avatar for Judy Perry

Judy Perry

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Judy currently oversees design, development and research for several projects involving games and simulations for mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets. Her research interests include location-based games and ubiquitous “casual” games. When she is not making or playing mobile games, Judy also leads professional development workshops for educators who want to implement location-based and other games in both formal and informal... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2013 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Old Madison

2:30pm

Assassin's Creed III: The Complete Unofficial Guide, a Teacher's Limited Edition

Well-Played:
Assassin's Creed III: The Complete Unofficial Guide, a Teacher's Limited Edition

Assassin’s Creed III (2012) was released with much fanfare, as it was the third major title in a series of successful open-world, sandbox titles. By design, Assassin’s Creed III takes one step further at becoming a great piece of historical fiction which has intrigued gamer designers and history educators alike. The detail and accuracy in the painstakingly recreated 18th century cities and frontiers has received high praise and force the player to explore all that is around them—a staple of sandbox video games. Additionally, because the fictional storyline was written to closely follow the mystery surrounding real life events during the American Revolution, the game has become an excellent source for players to discover unknowns about these events, to uncover the variety of perspectives, and to investigate the causes and effects of political unrest present throughout the time.

Wade Berger, Patrick Staley


Speaker
avatar for Wade Berger

Wade Berger

Graduate Student Research Assistant, University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Patrick Staley

Patrick Staley

Social Sciences Department Chair, VOISE Academy High School
I've been teaching for five years in a blended learning environment. VOISE Academy High School was one of the first blended learning schools in the country and continues to be a source of innovative teaching methods. What I'm most passionate about is the success of my students through engaging curriculum.


Wednesday June 12, 2013 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Capitol View

2:30pm

Playful Learning: Building a Knowledge Base, Building a Movement

Workshop:
Playful Learning:  Building a Knowledge Base, Building a Movement

The field of learning games has made tremendous strides in the past decade; yet still has a long way to go in getting quality games in the hands of all learners for deeper, more meaningful learning experiences. This symposium will discuss the Playful Learning Initiative, which is an innovative knowledge base and community development strategy to help organize and mobilize the knowledge, resources and tools of our field into a network of impact. This session will speak to both game designers and teachers: we will cover key elements that game designers can create and design for so that teachers are better able to put those games to use in the classroom, and we'll discuss how teachers can contribute to the knowledge base and help their peers use games in the classroom.

Jen Groff, Remi Holden, Peter Stidwill


Speaker
avatar for Jen Groff

Jen Groff

VP of Learning & Program Development, Learning Games Network
learning, design, design for learning, assessment, education, systems, system dynamics, policy, learning environments, curriculum
avatar for Remi Holden

Remi Holden

GLS Playful Learning Summit Co-Chair, University of Colorado Denver
avatar for Peter Stidwill

Peter Stidwill

Executive Producer, Learning Games Network
I create educational games and digital learning products. I'm Executive Producer at the Learning Games Network, a non-profit spin-off of the MIT Education Arcade and the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Games+Learning+Society program. I produced the award-winning ethical-thinking game ‘Quandary’, and am now working on ‘Playful Learning’, an initiative to catalyze the use of game based learning in schools. I previously worked at the... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2013 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Class of '24

3:30pm

Delicious Snack Break!
Wednesday June 12, 2013 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Great Hall

3:30pm

Delicious Snack Break!
Wednesday June 12, 2013 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Great Hall

4:00pm

Computational Reasoning

This individual papers session, ”Computational Reasoning”, will include the following:

Patterns of play: Understanding computational thinking through game design
In the digital age, computational thinking is vital to successful participation they are also many barriers to success. Harnessing the potential for games to motivate youth, using game design as an entry point for programming skills shows promise for encouraging more young learners to pursue careers in computer science and technology careers (Hayes & Games, 2008). Our research team at UNIVERSITY has developed a game design curriculum around the design software Kodu, enabling interest-driven learning of computational thinking. Based on pilot data from camps, results suggest that through game design participants became faster and more adept at understanding and using programming concepts, assisted by increased debugging activity. The preliminary findings beg deeper analysis of the patterns of play that may facilitate deeper, more meaningful acquisition of core computer science concepts.
Gabriella Anton, Shannon Harris, Allison Salmon, Amanda Ochsner, Meagan Rothschild, Matthew Berland, Kurt Squire

Designing Gender: Modding in Minecraft
Technical knowledge and skill with digital technologies are essential to today’s global workplace. One way in which learners can acquire these skills is through participation in affinity spaces for video games. By using and creating content in these spaces, learners have motivation to practice skills such as programming and digital art creation. In these spaces they can also gain experience learning from and teaching others, also vital skills for an information economy. However, as women tend to not participate in the affinity spaces for as many games, it is possible that they are missing out on valuable learning opportunities. The popular game Minecraft may prove an exception, because the game has many female fans. What follows is an investigation of how whether or not women are creating content for the game, and whether or not their creations are welcomed in the fan community.
Kelly Tran, Benjamin DeVane

Learning with Portals: STEM Education Through Gaming
Portal 2, an award winning commercial video game by Valve Software, has entered the classroom as a popular teaching tool for mathematics, science and game design curricula. Two teachers, Steve Isaacs and Cameron Pittman, have successfully engaged and motivated students with Portal 2 and its accompanying Puzzle Maker world building tool. Steve, a middle school video game design teacher in Basking Ridge, NJ, uses the Puzzle Maker to teach computational thinking and the iterative design process in his courses. Students play the game to understand key design concepts to later design, create, and refine their own puzzles with the Puzzle Maker. Cameron, a high school physics teacher in Nashville, TN, turned the Puzzle Maker into a virtual physics laboratory. This past fall, Cameron’s students learned physics by building, running and analyzing experiments inside the Puzzle Maker. Joining Steve and Cameron is Leslie Redd, Former Director of Educational Programs at Valve. Leslie created a community of educators through the Steam for Schools “Teach with Portals” project. This project has enabled classroom teachers to utilize the product for free with students and provides an infrastructure for teachers to collaborate in creating meaningful lessons using Portal 2 and the Puzzle Maker. The session will focus on the possibilities of engaging students in meaningful learning opportunities by bringing commercial games like Portal 2 into the learning environment. Successes and challenges will be discussed in order to provide a context for continued implementation of games in learning.
Cameron Pittman, Steve Isaacs, Leslie Redd

Matthew Berland, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Matthew Berland

Matthew Berland

University of Wisconsin–Madison

Speaker
avatar for Gabriella Anton

Gabriella Anton

Research Specialist, Games Learning Society Center
Gabriella Anton graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with two bachelor's degrees in Psychology and Sociology in 2011. She worked in an independent Montessori school as a teaching assistant for 5 years throughout high school and college. She currently works at the Center for Games+Learning+Society designing and implementing a video game design curriculum, as well as studying how adults learn computational thinking and modeling.
avatar for Benjamin DeVane

Benjamin DeVane

Iowa City, Iowa, United States, University of Iowa
Identity & Learning | Computational Thinking | Design & Aesthetics
avatar for Steve Isaacs

Steve Isaacs

Teacher, Bernards Township Board of Ed
Steve has been a gamer since the days of Atari and his Apple II+. His parents were initially concerned with how consumed he was with technology. Now they chuckle as he has created a career around his passion. Steve has been teaching Video Game Design and Development for 15 years, starting with his innovative programming at Liberty Corner Computing, the interactive training and gaming center that he and his wife owned and operated for 10 years... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Ochsner

Amanda Ochsner

Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Southern California
avatar for Meagan Rothschild

Meagan Rothschild

Early Education Assessment and Design Specialist, WIDA
Kids, play, learning, media, music, general silliness.
avatar for Allison Salmon

Allison Salmon

Lead of Research Tool Development, Games + Learning + Society and the Learning Games Network
Allison Salmon is a Lead Software Engineer at the Learning Games Network and Games + Learning + Society Center in Madison, Wisconsin. At LGN she leads development on the ADAGE project, an open source platform for collecting and analyzing in-game data for assessing evidence of learning. Before joining LGN Allison worked as a technology programmer in the commercial game industry. During her years with Raven Software and Activision she shipped seven... Read More →
avatar for Kurt Squire

Kurt Squire

full professor, uw-madison


Wednesday June 12, 2013 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

4:00pm

Flouting Magic Circles

This individual papers session, ”Flouting Magic Circles”, will include the following:

Promoting embodied learning through virtual and real world gaming experiences
Embodied experiences can be important for changing attitudes, deepening understanding, and increasing science process skills. The Field Museum is interested in best practices for using and combining digital and analog moments for learning. Recent studies support the use of digital tools, particularly virtual worlds, for embodied learning. Other studies show that physical role-playing activities can lead to embodied learning. The choice of virtual or physical experiences to trigger embodied learning should tie directly to learning goals. In this workshop, participants will replicate activities from “I Dig Tanzania” that facilitated embodied learning: one that was most effective as a role-play and the other as a virtual world activity. External analysis documents the affective and content gains made by our teen participants. These results and participant feedback will be used to initiate a conversation about the importance of embodiment in achieving learning goals, particularly those that relate to attitudes and process.
Audrey Aronowsky, Beth Sanzenbacher, Mark Childs, Anna Peachey, Krystal Villanosa, Johanna Thompson, Kenneth Angielczyk

Augmented Reality and Neighborhood Narratives
An increasing number of people are utilizing their smartphones to craft mobile, geo-located stories and games. Many avail themselves of authoring tools such as 7scenes and ARIS, which allow authors to create end-user experiences that run like locative apps on most devices. While these experiences can be both novel and enjoyable, their emphasis on the screen often detracts attention away from the real world spatial features of a situation. This workshop will explore the idea of digital/physical “seams” as an alternate way of crafting mobile narratives. We will conduct a series of design and playtest activities that build off of the augmented reality application, Aurasma, to better understand how emphasizing the seam between the digital and the physical might have pedagogical and creative benefits.
LeAnne Wagner, Ingrid Erickson

Two-Way Play: Early Research Findings of Learning with Kinect Sesame Street TV
Microsoft Studios has recently released Kinect Sesame Street TV, a new form of media for television that merges traditional means of watching episodes with game like physical actions via the Xbox and Kinect. This paper presents an overview and early findings of an initial study that investigated how ideas of embodied cognition and comprehension can be leveraged to understand the experiences of three and four year old participants, and explore the ways in which bidirectional television can facilitate new meaning-making. Early research took place at Microsoft Research in Redmond, WA, and analysis is continuing at [removed for blind review]. The findings inform the development and design of other interactive television products and programs for early learners. The presentation also breaks down directions for future analysis, showing how initial findings illustrated a need for deeper research and analysis in the nuanced ways young children learn and demonstrate knowledge.
Meagan Rothschild

Richard Halverson, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Richard Halverson

Richard Halverson

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I'm a Professor at UW-Madison, and I study how technologies can and do transform teaching and learning in and out of schools. I work with the Wisconsin Collaborative Education Research Network (the Network); the Collaborative Assessment of Leadership for Learning project, and the Games, Learning and Society Research Center.

Speaker
avatar for Kenneth Angielczyk

Kenneth Angielczyk

Assistant Curator of Paleomammalogy, Field Museum of Natural History
I am a vertebrate paleontologist, and my research focuses on non-mammalian synapsids (ancient mammal relatives), the structure of the ecosystems in which they lived, and the end-Permian mass extinction. Starting in 2008, I have been involved in digital learning programs such as I Dig Science and Game of Bones, which draw on my research and fieldwork for key content.
avatar for Audrey Aronowsky

Audrey Aronowsky

Program Manager, Field Museum of Natural History
avatar for Mark Childs

Mark Childs

Freelance Academic, markchilds.org
I'm fascinated by how people are changed by technology; how they redefine their identity through it, how they experience new things as a result of it, and how it changes their communication and their relationships. I particularly study how it can enhance their learning and provide new opportunities for this. I've worked in three UK universities, researching this for 15 years, and now continue to do the same, but for a range of clients, rather... Read More →
IE

Ingrid Erickson

Assistant Professor, School of Communication and Information, Rutgers University
avatar for Meagan Rothschild

Meagan Rothschild

Early Education Assessment and Design Specialist, WIDA
Kids, play, learning, media, music, general silliness.
avatar for Beth Sanzenbacher

Beth Sanzenbacher

Outreach Coordinator, Field Museum of Natural History
Beth is the Outreach Coordinator for the Biodiversity Synthesis Center at the Field Museum of Natural History. She develops, implements, manages and evaluates select digital media programs and games, and participates in learning science research for the Museum’s Collection and Research Departments and the Encyclopedia of Life (eol.org). | | Through digital media programs she has combined her two passions of science and education, and... Read More →
avatar for Krystal Villanosa

Krystal Villanosa

Graduate Student, Northwestern University
Passionate about STEM, youth, learning technologies, and informal environments.
LW

LeAnne Wagner

Owner, Wagner Design and Consulting


Wednesday June 12, 2013 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Beefeaters

4:00pm

Making games for learning: Lessons learned in design and development

Symposium:
Making games for learning: Lessons learned in design and development

This symposium brings together lead designers from three game development shops that specialize in the design and development of games for learning. While each shop makes learning games, they focus on games with distinct audiences and objectives. Through a series of short individual presentations and extensive Q&A with conference attendees, this session will explore both common practices in designing games for learning, and aspects of design in which each designer has developed their own approaches and insights based on practice.

Moses Wolfenstein, Dan Norton, Mike Beall


Speaker
avatar for Mike Beall

Mike Beall

Project Leader, Learning Games Network
I am a Game Designer, Project Leader, and Artist working with the Learning Games Network and Games Learning Society. In addition to direct involvement with design and development of many GLS/LGN games, I also work with local schools and community centers where I engage with University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty and students to conduct playtests, interviews, and focus group tests.
avatar for Moses Wolfenstein

Moses Wolfenstein

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin, Extension
Moses has worked in the field of education for over a decade, and has been studying and creating games and other digital media for learning since 2006. He holds a PhD from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis where he worked with his adviser Rich Halverson on games for school leadership. As SeniorInteraction Developer at University of Wisconsin-Extension, Moses works to improve user experiences and... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2013 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Old Madison

4:00pm

A Well-Played Fiasco

Well-Played:
A Well-Played Fiasco: A Game About Powerful Collaboration and Poor Narrative Control

The role-playing game Fiasco (Morningstar, 2009) provides an interesting case of collaborative narrative construction in the context of a game about a collective series of failures. Addressing the mechanics, dynamics, and aesthetics of the game (Hunicke, LeBlanc, and Zubek, 2004), this paper addresses the specific interactions of mechanics that give rise to the game’s collaborative dynamics, and the sense of “fun” that evolves from the tension of narrative construction and character destruction. Implications for understanding collaboration and failure in learning are discussed, as well as instructional implications of the game’s rule structures.

Sean Duncan


Speaker
SD

Sean Duncan

Indiana University, United States of America


Wednesday June 12, 2013 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Capitol View

4:00pm

Analyzing Log File Data to Understand Players

Workshop:
Analyzing Log File Data to Understand Players

There is great interest in using games to assess players’ knowledge, skills, and abilities. However, while games are capable of collecting information about micro-processes of players as they move through the environment, procedures for translating this information into inferences about player proficiencies are not well known. This workshop will introduce participants to specific techniques for uncovering patterns in log file data. Participants will conduct and interpret analyses using R software to uncover player groups, action clusters, and patterns of action that can illuminate differences between players at different levels of constructs of interest. Players will leave with steps and practical skills for using log file data to make inferences about player characteristics.

Kristen DiCerbo


Speaker
avatar for Kristen DiCerbo

Kristen DiCerbo

Vice President of Education Research, Pearson
Kristen is the Vice-President of Education Research at Pearson, working to integrate learning science research into digital products. Her personal research program centers around game-based assessment, specifically the collaborative design of games as both learning and assessment tools and the use of statistical models to turn data into evidence of student knowledge, skills, and attributes. She has worked on a computer networking game at Cisco... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2013 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Class of '24

5:00pm

Poster Session and Dinner

 

Mathematics is a Game Played with Symbols 
David Landy, Erin Ottmar

Students' perceptions of how video games affect learning in a developed and a developing country 
Leif Marklund, Hakim Usoof

Engagement, Understanding, and Achievement: Iterative Assessment and Refinement of Khipu Master
Ellen Jameson, Daniel Hickey

Designing a Game-Inspired Learning Management System
Caitlin Holman, Barry Fishman, Stephen Aguilar

Visual Analysis Toolkit: 5 Use Cases
Jeff Holmes, Rebecca Hoffman, Ben Pincus, Alex Cope, Jesse Shedd, Tenneille Choi

GeoGame: An Online Geography Game for Learning about the Green Revolution
Brendon Mikula, Andrew Heckler, Ola Ahlqvist, Rohan Benkar, Rajiv Ramnath, Kiril Vatev

Pedagogical Agents in Game-based Mathematics Learning in Virtual Worlds: OpenSim project Bazaar
Heesung Kim, Gwynn Grandy, Sungwoong Lee, Taehyeong Lim, Fengfeng Ke

A Design-Based Research: An Initial Model of an Embodied Cognition Based Video Game for Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder
Sungwoong Lee, Fengfeng Ke

Gaming Bloom's: Deconstructing the Revised Taxonomy for Games-Based Learning
Jayne C. Lammers, Victoria Van Voorhis

Interactive Learning Assessment: Providing Context and Simulating Professional Practices
Vanessa Svihla, Elizabeth Yakes, Tim Castillo, Andrea Cantarero, Isaac Valdez, Natalie Dominguez

Leaving the Cave Without Losing the Transfer: ARGs and Integrated Performance in Operation ARETE
Roger Travis, Stephen Slota, Michael Young

WhyReef: A Virtual, Educational Program Analysis
Cody Jolin, Sylvia Tiala

Bringing School Psychology to the sandbox: designing an educational video game
Fernando Teles, Cleci Maraschin, Larissa Medeiros M. Santos, Glauber Benigno, Vinicius Guanais, Cyrille Gindreau, Dener Silva

College Quest: A Game-based LMS and Academic Social Network
Francesco Crocco, Joe Bisz

One day in the Botanical Garden - Work in Progress
Cleci Maraschin, Poti Gavillon, Renata Kroeff, Rebeca Andreolla

ConJugador
Alberto Ramirez, Jonathan Ibarra, Liliana Camacho, Miguel Solis, Bernardo Ramirez

Online Map Games - playful interaction with geographical science tools
Ola Ahlqvist, Rohan Benkar, Rajiv Ramnath, Kiril Vatev, Andrew Heckler, Brendon Mikula

Safety Nets Simplified: Simulated Decision-Making in Volatile Developing Economies
Lien Tran

The Cognition of Gameplay: Cognitive Task Analysis and Portal 2
Patrick Gallagher, Shenan Prestwich

Gaming the General Consequences of Learning
Steven Zuiker

Procedural Rhetorics criticizing Capitalism - Trails Forward as a Multi-Player Persuasive Game
Patrick Prax, Mark Stenerson, Ben Shapiro

Designer Research MetaGame
Cary Staples

Using Virtual World Lego to Develop Fraction Understanding
Wei Qiang, Fengfeng Ke

Experiences of the Self in Affinity Spaces with Videogames
Carlos Baum, Poti Gavillon, Renata Kroeff, Cleci Maraschin

Producing Educational Mini Games: A Worked Example of the Agile Production Approach
Gabrielle Garner

Students Dream It, They Build it: 3D Virtual Worlds Enter A High School
Lilly Lu, Aline Click

The Island of Pi - Facilitating Math Learning through a Virtual-Reality-Based Game Intervention
Xinhao Xu, Xingrong Xue, Zhaihuan Dai, Yanjun Pan, Fengfeng Ke

Qualitative methods for studying learning through gameplay at museums and science centers
Sarah Chu, Jason Yip, Jason Haas, Christine Roman

Gamification of the student activity in a net-based course discussion
Leif Marklund, Peter Vinnervik

Digital Badges for Recognizing, Assessing, Motivating, and Evaluating Learning in Games and Beyond
Daniel Hickey, Rebecca Itow, Andi Rehak, Katerina Schenke, Cathy Tran

Augmented Reality Family Interactions Study
Michelle Tiu, Yvonne Kao, Elizabeth McCarthy, Danielle Yumol, Linlin Li, Katherine Kuhns, Priscilla Motley

Gaming Goal Orientations: An Empirical Motivation Framework
John Quick, Robert Atkinson

SimQuabbin Project: Game-based Environmental Science Education in a Virtual World
Scott Payne, Mark Santolucito

yoU Make It GO!: Mathematics at Play
UMIGO Project

GETUP: Health Gaming for "the Rest of Your Life"
Cynthia Ching, Robin Hunicke

Design of Social Games for Fostering Sustained Behavior Change in Healthy Eating and Exercise
Shree Durga, Magy Seif El-Nasr, Mariya Shiyko, Carmen Sceppa, Pamela Naab

How to Look at Videogames: Three Perspectives
Jeff Holmes

Developing "Agency": Pre-Service Art Educators Learning Digital Game Design
Ryan Patton, Luke Meeken

Games for Development: Using the SGDA Framework for Assessing Serious Games in ICTD
Kara Behnke, John Bennett

Grounds Keeper: Extending Focus and Attention through Play
Seann Dikkers, Chris Hawks, Mark Mace

The Effects of Framing on Game Play Experience and Learning
Cote Theriault

Chaired by Gabriella Anton


Discussants
avatar for Gabriella Anton

Gabriella Anton

Research Specialist, Games Learning Society Center
Gabriella Anton graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with two bachelor's degrees in Psychology and Sociology in 2011. She worked in an independent Montessori school as a teaching assistant for 5 years throughout high school and college. She currently works at the Center for Games+Learning+Society designing and implementing a video game design curriculum, as well as studying how adults learn computational thinking and modeling.

Speaker
avatar for Stephen J. Aguilar

Stephen J. Aguilar

Ph.D. Candidate, ABD & Visiting Scholar, University of Michigan / UC Irvine
I am an ABD in Education and Psychology at the University of Michigan, and research the design, efficacy, and motivational implications of learning analytics applications. Specifically, I am interested in how representations of achievement influence students' academic motivation and self-regulated learning strategies. My dissertation study focuses on capturing and measuring students' sense-making processes when exposed to potential visualizations... Read More →
avatar for Ola Ahlqvist

Ola Ahlqvist

Associate Professor, The Ohio State University
avatar for Dr. Robert Atkinson

Dr. Robert Atkinson

Associate Professor, Arizona State University
avatar for Kara Behnke

Kara Behnke

PhD Student, University of Colorado Boulder, ATLAS Institute, Quarter Heart Studios
I am a GameGodde55: I help people better themselves through digital games. As a PhD student, I am passionate about discovering new ways to leverage and assess game-based learning, persuasive games, gamification, and games for STEM education. When I'm not saving the world of education through games, I design and develop games for my start-up company, Quarter Heart Studios. And naturally, as an avid gamer, I constantly save the world via my... Read More →
GB

Glauber Benigno

Não tenho nada a dizer sobre mim.
avatar for Joe Bisz

Joe Bisz

English Professor and Game Designer, City University of New York
I'm a professional development speaker, and I've designed several card games that teach game design.
LC

Liliana Camacho

Dirección de arte, Chido Games
Me encanta El arte, la ilustración, animación, el diseño de juegos
avatar for Cynthia Ching

Cynthia Ching

Associate Professor of Learning and Mind Sciences, University of California, Davis
Technology and identity, personal data gaming, embodied cognition, games and behavior.
avatar for Aline Click

Aline Click

Director, Digital Convergence Lab and eLearning Services, Northern Illinois University
Director of the Digital Convergence Lab at Northern Illinois University. Research on girls and video game, STEM, and gender issues. Interests include, teaching video game design, virtual worlds as learning environments, online education, and cockatoos.
FC

Francesco Crocco

Assistant Professor, Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY
avatar for Gabrielle Garner, Ph. D.

Gabrielle Garner, Ph. D.

The Home Depot
"We have always tried to be guided by the idea that in the discovery of knowledge, there is great entertainment." Walt Disney | | Recent research interest: Finding a more complete/honest way to calculate return on investment for learning innovations
avatar for Seann Dikkers

Seann Dikkers

Education Department Chair, Bethel University
Seann Dikkers is an associate professor of Education at Bethel University. Formerly, Seann served fourteen years as a middle school teacher, high school principal, and researcher. Now he teaches, writes, and works with some amazing colleagues at Bethel. He studies exemplary teaching, learning design, and learning systems. His books include *Real-Time Research*, *Mobile Media Learning I and II*, and *TeacherCraft: Minecraft in the Classroom... Read More →
avatar for Shree Durga

Shree Durga

Postdoctoral Researcher, Playable Innovative Technologies (PLAIT) Lab, Northeastern University
computational literacy, modding and information analytics, player engagement and learning in games
avatar for Barry Fishman

Barry Fishman

Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Gameful learning, GradeCraft, motivation, higher education
avatar for Patrick Gallagher

Patrick Gallagher

Learning Scientist/PM, Advanced Distributed Learning/Serco
Dr. Shane Gallagher received his Ph.D. in Instructional Technology from George Mason University and MA in Educational Technology from the University of New Mexico. He has led research and evaluation projects in game-based learning and cognition, learning object content models, simulations, reusable pedagogical models, organizational readiness, and knowledge management. Shane has designed enterprise learning and knowledge architectures, learning... Read More →
avatar for Jason Haas

Jason Haas

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Jason is a Research Assistant and PhD candidate in The Education Arcade and the Center for Mobile Learning in the MIT Media Lab. He is also an Early Career Scholar at the Harvard Graduate School of Education in the Spencer New Civics Education Program.His research focuses on designing interesting civic, multiplayer experiences (for learning and otherwise) and evaluating them in context. Recent work includes the Jigsaw-based iPad game SANCTUARY... Read More →
AH

Andrew Heckler

Associate Professor of Physics, Ohio State University
I started in Cosmology/Astrophysics, but now I study how people learn (or don't learn!) Physics. My group is interested in exploring how interaction via computers, such as interactive homework etc, can help students to achieve instructional goals for physics courses, such as deep understanding of important physics concepts and problem solving.
DH

Daniel Hickey

BOOC at IU - Big Open Online Courses
Dan Hickey’s work focuses on "participatory" approaches to assessment, motivation, & credentialing, and work in e-learning, videogames, open learning, & new media contexts. In recent years, strands of work have come together in a framework he calls "Participatory Learning and Assessment." Since 2012, he has directed the Open Badges Design Principles Documentation Project. This project is examining the design principles emerging across the 30... Read More →
CH

Caitlin Holman

Ann Arbor, MI, United States of America, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
avatar for Jeffrey Brandon Holmes

Jeffrey Brandon Holmes

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
Jeff Holmes is a Founding Graduate Fellow at the Center for Games and Impact at Arizona State University, a PhD student in Rhetoric and Composition in the Department of English, and a life-long gamer. His research focuses on how games demonstrate good principles of teaching outside of school, how communities collectively construct identities, and how gaming and play extend to multiple sites beyond the traditional boundaries of 'gamespace.' In... Read More →
avatar for Robin Hunicke

Robin Hunicke

Co-Founder, Funomena LLC
Robin Hunicke is the CEO & Co-Founder of the San Francisco studio Funomena, which makes experimental VR (Luna), AR (Woorld) and console (Wattam) experiences. She has been designing, making and teaching about games for over 12 years (Journey, Boom Blox, MySims, TheSims2). | A designer and producer by training, she has a background in computer science, fine art and applied game studies. As Director of the Art, Games & Playable Media BA... Read More →
avatar for Jonathan Ibarra

Jonathan Ibarra

CEO Chido Games, Chido Games
I love music, I enjoy having fun with my friends and in my spare time develop videogames and tools for voice recognition
RI

Rebecca Itow

Rebecca Itow, a former high school English teacher, has been one of the lead researchers on the Open Badges project and is putting participatory learning and assessment principles into practice through her work with the online Indiana University High School. 
avatar for Ellen Jameson

Ellen Jameson

Learning Specialist, Filament Games
I am a Learning Specialist at Filament Games, and a Visiting Research Associate at Indiana University's Center for Research on Learning and Technology. My research interests include investigating the use of games to facilitate education and discussion around issues in environmental science. I work with games as tools offering a useful balance of complexity, contextualization, visualization, and control, for communities to explore, debate, and... Read More →
avatar for Cody Jolin

Cody Jolin

Student, University of Wisconsin - Stout
I have always had a passion for video games and believe they can be powerful educational tools. Last summer I began working with the Field Museum to investigate the educational effectiveness of WhyReef: an online, social coral reef simulation aimed at young children. After presenting my results at the Field Museum, I am ready to share them with the GLS Conference. | | My interests include computer programming, making music videos, running... Read More →
FK

Fengfeng Ke

Assistant Professor, Florida State University
Computer-supported collaborative learning, game-based learning, e-learning
avatar for Jayne C. Lammers

Jayne C. Lammers

Assistant professor, University of Rochester
affinity space research; online research methods; videogame and other digital literacies; writing; 21st century learning; adolescent literacies; English teacher preparation
avatar for Sungwoong Lee

Sungwoong Lee

doctoral candidate, Florida State University
LL

Linlin Li

Research Associate, WESTED
avatar for Alberto Ramirez

Alberto Ramirez

CEO, Chido Games
I'm a linguist and game designer who believe video games can help to bring plurilingualism to the world, so I'm committed to design and develop video games that allow people to get to know new languages and cultures.
avatar for Jesse Shedd

Jesse Shedd

Undergraduate, Arizona State University
avatar for Stephen Slota

Stephen Slota

Co-Founder, The Pericles Group, LLC
Steve (@steveslota) is an instructional design specialist and game design scientist at the University of Connecticut Health Center and a co-founder of The Pericles Group, LLC. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Cognition, Instruction, & Learning Technologies and has worked on a variety of game and instructional design projects with organizations including Arizona State University's Center for Games & Impact, Intel Corporation, and... Read More →
MS

Miguel Solis

Sonat
Indie Toastmaster Runner Program Manager Music Producer Mike
avatar for Cary Staples

Cary Staples

Professor : School of Art, University of Tennessee
my students call me the "designosaur". I am one of "those" who studied in Brissago. | I am a creative problem solver, designer, origami explorer, I love visualizing math. I have to learn to code in "processing" for my next idea, damn it. | My students helped me to design a game for my "Idea of Design" class to replace test, yeah. | I currently have a group of "rogue" students working on a game to teach french to undergraduate students... Read More →
avatar for Mark  Stenerson

Mark Stenerson

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
VS

Vanessa Svihla

Assistant Professor, University of New Mexico
Design & Learning.
avatar for Cathy Tran

Cathy Tran

Researcher, UC Irvine
http://education.uci.edu/person/tran_c/tran_c_bio.php
avatar for Lien Tran

Lien Tran

Assistant Professor, University of Miami
Game Design. Social Impact Games. Social Change. Higher Education.
avatar for Roger Travis

Roger Travis

Storrs, CT, US, University of Connecticut, and The Pericles Group, LLC
Only connect: ancient epic to video games; teacher to student; gamer to gamer; fan to fan; parent to child; human being to human being.
avatar for Victoria Van Voorhis

Victoria Van Voorhis

CEO, Second Avenue Learning
Victoria Van Voorhis is the founder and CEO of Second Avenue Learning, which designs and develops interactive media, serious games and learning management systems to improve educational outcomes. Prior to founding Second Avenue, Victoria was a teacher at the middle, high school and college levels. A thought leader in the educational gaming space, Victoria speaks regularly at national conferences on serious games. Her goal with Second Avenue is to... Read More →
avatar for Michael Young

Michael Young

UConn
A situated cognitive view of learning on-the-fly in video game environments, through rich narratives, assessed through card play and understood as social participation, with an ecological psychology flare.
avatar for Steve Zuiker

Steve Zuiker

Assistant Professor, Arizona State University
My work considers the design of interactive learning environments such as educational videogames and how these designs can better inform our understanding of the general consequences of learning. In contrast to a conventional view of knowledge transfer, I enlist the idea of learning transitions in order to advance the conceptual and empirical adequacy of a socio-cultural perspective on the general consequences of meaningful play within and around... Read More →


Wednesday June 12, 2013 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Great Hall

7:00pm

Art Exhibition and Reception

The third annual GLS Games & Art Exhibit opening - with refreshments!  The theme this year is:  Worlds Collide: Fantasy and Reality.

Temperance
Josh Fishburn

His and Hers
Theresa Devine

Instramirror
Mark Santolucito

Lucidity
Game Changer Chicago Design Lab

Museum of the Microstar
Rust Media

3D Printer: Self Portrait
Libby Falck

Story Shards: Assemblage of Curiosities from the Arcane Gallery of Gadgetry
Elizabeth Bonsignore, Kari Kraus, Amanda Visconti, Derek Hansen, Ann Fraistat

Visions of Aleph
Karl Baumann

Paths and Environments
Travis Faas

Gone From an Age: A Fitting
Amanda Dittami, Blair Kuhlman, Anthony Sixto, Matthew Farmer

GLaDOS/Wheatley
Mage Lanz

The Duck Game
James Earl Cox III

Don't Kill the Cow
James Earl Cox III

Zombie Yoga - Recovering the Inner Child
Doris C. Rusch

One Life
Stephen Hilyard

Making an Apple Pie from Scratch
Mage Lanz

Troll Runner
Carrie Cole

BioHarmonious
Art Works For Change

Surrealist Drawings
V Holeček

You, A Very Meaningful Game
Lindsay D. Grace

Curated by Mark Riechers and Arnold Martin

 


Discussants
avatar for Mark Riechers

Mark Riechers

Freelance writer and photographer
Freelance writer, semi-professional nerd. Lover of films, games, TV and technology. Photographer and art show coordinator for GLS 9.0. Boston terrier papa.

Speaker
avatar for Karl Baumann

Karl Baumann

PhD Student in Media Arts Practice (MAP), University of Southern California
Karl Baumann is a digital artist, filmmaker, and scholar. His current work explores immersive, playable, and mobile media to navigate the complex layers of urban spaces. After completing an MFA in Digital Arts and New Media (DANM) at UC Santa Cruz, Karl taught media literacy with the Boys and Girls Club and was active in Occupy Oakland. In addition to his locative and playable media projects, Karl has produced multiple award-winning documentaries... Read More →
TD

Theresa Devine

Assisitant Professor, Arizona State University at the West campus
Theresa Devine is an Assistant Professor in the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University. Theresa received her BFA in Painting and Printmaking at Texas A & M University- Corpus Christi in 1991 and her MFA in Painting at University of Houston in 1994. In her personal artwork she explores games, toys and play. Her work as lead of the Studio 4 Gaming Innovation research lab on the West campus focuses on... Read More →
avatar for Travis Faas

Travis Faas

Lecturer, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis
Travis Trivia: | | - Teaches game and web development at IUPUI. | - Has been teaching for 5(+) years | - Is riding the VR train like many others | - Loves to talk about the non-real reality of virtual worlds | - Wants to make a bunch of stupid games that may, or may not, have useful properties | - Made a game where you need to sing to throw coffee cups at customers | - Wants to make a game about dancing with ghosts | - Is in a... Read More →
LF

Libby Falck

Maker Education Guru, ChangeX Education
Libby Falck is an entrepreneur, designer and multimedia artist based between San Francisco and New York. She is a curriculum designer, edtech consultant, and a co-founder of several STEAM-oriented startups. She is also a graduate of the Singularity University Graduate Studies Program and the 4.0 Schools Launch Accelerator. Libby’s mission is to design scalable experiences and technologies that massively increase access to effective 21st century... Read More →
MF

Matthew Farmer

Matthew Farmer is a professional game programmer who works for a Dallas-based mobile games company. He is a graduate of the Computer Science department of Arkansas State University. He has been developing games for over half his lifetime. Outside of game development, Matt is an avid musician and enjoys recording music with his wife.
avatar for Lindsay D. Grace

Lindsay D. Grace

Director, American University Game Lab
Lindsay Grace is a professor, game designer, programmer and artist. | Lindsay is an associate professor at American University and founding director of the American University Game Lab and Studio. His game designs have received awards from the Games for Change Festival, Meaningful Play, Advances in Computer Entertainment and Gamescape. He has published more than 40 papers, articles and book chapters on games since 2009. His creative work has... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Hilyard

Stephen Hilyard

Professor of Digital Arts, University of Wisconsin Madison
avatar for V Holeček

V Holeček

Visual Artist, Schamballah Studio
I make art with a "fifth world" sensibility. I work almost exclusively in colored pencil, utilizing a labor-intensive technique that is frequently mistaken for painting.
avatar for James Earl Cox III

James Earl Cox III

James Earl Cox III makes games, and in his spare time he attends Miami University of Ohio as an undergraduate, majoring in Creative Writing, Interactive Media Studies, and Mass Communications. He has exhibited at conferences and has published in university and literary magazines. He once tried to catch a poorly rendered cat that gliched up his left hand pretty bad.
KK

Kari Kraus

Associate Professor, University of Maryland
avatar for Doris Rusch

Doris Rusch

Chicago, IL, USA, DePaul University
The human condition is extremely fascinating to me: what makes us tick? What's the spectrum of our emotions? How do we make sense of our experiences and share them with others? Games are a great medium to create shared experiences related to the human condition. One of my main areas of exploration related to that are mental health issues and the use of metaphors to make abstract ideas tangible. I made a few metaphorical games about addiction... Read More →
AS

Anthony Sixto

Anthony Sixto is a Chicago based professional artist who works as a 3D and 2D artist in games, apps and animation. Independently he works on political cartoons, comics and films with a focus on cultural sociology. His goal is not only to master his art but to find a space to create entertaining content that also carries a strong sense of social commentary.


Wednesday June 12, 2013 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Gallery 7, Humanities Building

9:00pm

Arcade
Wednesday June 12, 2013 9:00pm - Thursday June 13, 2013 12:00am
Tripp Commons
 
Thursday, June 13
 

8:00am

Registration Opens
Thursday June 13, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Annex Room

9:00am

Breakfast and Keynote (Mary Flanagan)
Playfully Changing Stereotypes and Biases
Mary Flanagan, Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Professor in Digital Humanities at Dartmouth College, will discuss emerging trends in psychology and games, focusing specifically on social biases.  The session will focus on the increasingly important role games are playing in social change efforts and the specific attitudes that can be changed through games through specific design strategies. Games are complex systems that affect attitudes and behaviors in subtle ways. This talk will provide background in psychological issues that impact learning, and furthers our understanding of the role that games might have in the future of learning. 

Dr. Flanagan will be introduced by Dean Julie Underwood, School of Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

Speaker
MF

Mary Flanagan

Mary Flanagan is an award winning game designer and author of Critical Play: Radical Game Design (2009, MIT Press). Flanagan pushes the boundaries of medium and genre across writing, visual arts, and design to innovate in these fields with her 'critical play'-centered approach. She researches and creates games at Tiltfactor, the theory/practice laboratory she founded in 2003 directed at social change play. Tiltfactor... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2013 9:00am - 10:00am
Great Hall

10:00am

Arcade
Thursday June 13, 2013 10:00am - 8:00pm
Tripp Commons

10:30am

Building the next science generation through game-based learning in museums

Fireside Chat:
Building the next science generation through game-based learning in museums

In this chat, the American Museum of Natural History and The Field Museum will highlight different approaches to build a science-positive generation through museum-centered digital gaming programming both on-site and off. The case studies cross a spectrum of technologies and museum-centered goals, and speak to the diversity of techniques being used. Case studies will introduce broader questions about digital gaming and museum-based learning, such as: Is there a conflict between the physical assets of a museum and the ephemeral nature of digital tools? Can youth only learn by simulating the scientific process or can they work with the same tools and data as scientists to participate in and contribute to on-going investigations? To what extent do museum-led digital learning programs need to be centered in the museum’s physical space? How can a museum support youth to navigate their interest-driven learning and to develop a lifelong passion for science?

Audrey Aronowsky, Beth Sanzenbacher, Barry Joseph, Preeti Gupta, Beth Crownover


Speaker
avatar for Audrey Aronowsky

Audrey Aronowsky

Program Manager, Field Museum of Natural History
avatar for Barry Joseph

Barry Joseph

Associate Director of Digital Learning, American Museum of Natural History
Barry Joseph is Associate Director of Digital Learning at the American Museum of Natural History. Since 2000, he has developed innovative programs in the areas of youth-produced video games, mobile and augmented learning, virtual worlds, digital fabrication, alternative assessments models, and more, always seeking to combine youth development practices with the development of high profile digital media projects that develop 21st Century Skills... Read More →
avatar for Beth Sanzenbacher

Beth Sanzenbacher

Outreach Coordinator, Field Museum of Natural History
Beth is the Outreach Coordinator for the Biodiversity Synthesis Center at the Field Museum of Natural History. She develops, implements, manages and evaluates select digital media programs and games, and participates in learning science research for the Museum’s Collection and Research Departments and the Encyclopedia of Life (eol.org). | | Through digital media programs she has combined her two passions of science and education, and... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2013 10:30am - 11:30am
Capitol View

10:30am

Design is a Bitch

This Hall of Failure session, ”Design is a Bitch”, will include the following:

“You Know You’re Going to Fail, Right?”: Learning From Design Flaws in Just Press Play at RIT
In the fall of 2010, faculty in the School of Interactive Games & Media at RIT began the initial planning for an achievement system meant to recognize and reward student engagement in non-curricular activities—specifically activities that successful graduates of the program regularly cited as significant factors in their undergraduate experience. This paper describes the design process used to create the initial version of the Just Press Play achievement system, the results of the implementation during the 2011-12 academic year, and the significant redesign of the system that took place based on assessment of the first year of the system. We focus on the elements that didn’t work in our initial design, and how those failures informed our redesign process. 
Elizabeth Lawley, Andrew Phelps

Awe and Blunder in Science Games
From 2008-2010, the author produced dozens of science education games for a national science education organization. The games were created in collaboration with scientists from numerous agencies and universities and are currently being played in classrooms across the globe. Many of these games have gone on to win awards and several are currently available for free and online. The successes, however, were purchased via fruitful mistakes. In this micro-presentation, the author will discuss the most productive failures during those two years and highlight guiding principles used to inform more successful subsequent projects. While the talk centers around science games in particular, many of the ideas can be applied to anyone designing games with the intent of having them played in formal education settings.
Marjee Chmiel

Hurry up and fail!
For 20 years Brian has developed retail games for Raven software and Activision and is currently working for Learning Games Network in Partnership with the GLS Center to create games for research and social & educational impact. Good Game design is an amorphous intangible object that needs to be cultivated into existence. Iterative prototypes bring the ideas to life quickly; however, it’s more important to get the bad ideas out of your system. Developing around bad game design is a colossal waste of time, energy and money. Creating design pillars for your game to stand on can be the key to solving those nagging design problems and forge ahead with confidence. This talk will give examples from past games where the design was flawed from inception and through quick failure and the creation of pillars did the designs finally emerge to become award winning multi-million selling games. The principles presented can be applied to any game design so you can hurry up and fail, then create the game your audience will enjoy.
Brian Pelletier

Ellen Jameson, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Ellen Jameson

Ellen Jameson

Learning Specialist, Filament Games
I am a Learning Specialist at Filament Games, and a Visiting Research Associate at Indiana University's Center for Research on Learning and Technology. My research interests include investigating the use of games to facilitate education and discussion around issues in environmental science. I work with games as tools offering a useful balance of complexity, contextualization, visualization, and control, for communities to explore, debate, and... Read More →

Speaker
avatar for Marjee Chmiel

Marjee Chmiel

Educational Technology Specialist, Smithsonian Science Education Center
Marjee Chmiel has been growing locally sourced, organic educational technology for over 15 years. She specializes in several heirloom varietals, though her favorites are science and early childhood. Her educational technology is 100% vegan and fair trade. Fresh from ed tech orchards near the Nation's Capital and served piping hot to eager learners world-wide.
avatar for Liz Lawley

Liz Lawley

Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology
avatar for Brian Pelletier

Brian Pelletier

Creative Director & Head of Development, Games Learning Society Center & Learning Games Network
I'm a professional artist and appreciate the comic book art form for storytelling. I have been developing video games for 21 years. I love creating story through art and games provided me the opportunity to bring artwork to life in an interactive story. After developing and shipping 16 AAA retail games that my kids could not play I became passionate about creating games for them that would be fun and meaningful. I'm able to follow that passion... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2013 10:30am - 11:30am
Beefeaters

10:30am

Assessment

This individual papers session, ”Assessment”, will include the following:

Working through Impulse: Assessment of Emergent Learning in a Physics Game
Games may offer a unique opportunity to support and observe intuitive learning that could be foundational for further STEM learning. This paper reports on the game, Impulse, that immerses players in the physical laws of Newtonian motion and discusses our attempts to observe tacit knowledge as it develops through gameplay. This research is mid-stream in the process of identifying a set of cognitive strategies that players develop as they advance in the game and attempting to relate those strategies to developing tacit understandings of underlying science in the game. Researchers are analyzing video from playtesting and mining the associated click data to define predictable cognitive strategies. This project is ripe for discussion about what can be inferred about learning from development of strategies in a game.
Jodi Asbell-Clarke, Elizabeth Rowe, Elisabeth Sylvan, Ryan Baker

Gameplay As Assessment: Exploring In-Game Failure, Success and Learning Using GBA (a Game-Based Assessment Model)
This paper presents an exploration of in-game success, failure, and learning using Game-Based Assessment (GBA). The GBA assessment model is designed to capture relevant information on play and test whether it can constitute reliable evidence of learning. A central challenge for videogames research in education is to demonstrate evidence of player learning. Assessment designers need to attend to the ways in which game-play itself can provide a powerful new form of assessment. Facilitating this, the GBA model has two key layers which build on content-based educational game design: a semantic template that determines which click-stream data events could be indicators of learning; and learning telemetry that captures data for analysis. This study highlights how the GBA was implemented in a stem-cell science learning game, and shows how the GBA demonstrates a relationship between kinds of failure and learning in the game.
V. Elizabeth Owen, Shannon Harris, Dennis Ramirez, Richard Halverson

Participatory Assessment: A Game Design Model for Impacting Engagement, Understanding, and (as Necessary) Achievement
Participatory Assessment is a game design model for obtaining diverse learning and/or social outcomes in innovative learning environments. It fosters participation in socio-technological interactions that ensures individual understanding of targeted concepts. As necessary, the model has also been capable of improving and documenting impact of aggregated achievement. The model emerged from assessment-oriented design studies in several environments, including the Quest Atlantis 3-D virtual environment. This paper introduces the five general design principles that make up DFP, along with the more specific design principles that emerged across give design cycles of the Taiga game in Quest Atlantis. Specific game features are summarized, along with evidence of the impact of those features in the Taiga design studies.
Daniel Hickey

Matthew Berland, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Matthew Berland

Matthew Berland

University of Wisconsin–Madison

Speaker
avatar for Jodi Asbell-Clarke

Jodi Asbell-Clarke

Director, TERC
I direct a team of game designers, researchers, and learning scientists who live and work on the edge of science and play.
avatar for Richard Halverson

Richard Halverson

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I'm a Professor at UW-Madison, and I study how technologies can and do transform teaching and learning in and out of schools. I work with the Wisconsin Collaborative Education Research Network (the Network); the Collaborative Assessment of Leadership for Learning project, and the Games, Learning and Society Research Center.
DH

Daniel Hickey

BOOC at IU - Big Open Online Courses
Dan Hickey’s work focuses on "participatory" approaches to assessment, motivation, & credentialing, and work in e-learning, videogames, open learning, & new media contexts. In recent years, strands of work have come together in a framework he calls "Participatory Learning and Assessment." Since 2012, he has directed the Open Badges Design Principles Documentation Project. This project is examining the design principles emerging across the 30... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Owen

Elizabeth Owen

Director, Learning & Data Science, Age of Learning
Elizabeth Owen holds a PhD in Digital Media (School of Education) from UW-Madison, focused on game-based learning analytics. Currently the Director of Learning and Data Science at Age of Learning, she's committed to optimizing adaptive learning systems through applied machine learning. Previously a researcher and data scientist with GlassLab Games (EA campus), LRNG, and Metacog, her doctoral work is rooted at the Games+Learning+Society Center... Read More →
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Technical Director, USC IMGD, Videogame Researcher
avatar for Elizabeth Rowe

Elizabeth Rowe

Director of Research, EdGE @ TERC


Thursday June 13, 2013 10:30am - 11:30am
Inn Wisconsin

10:30am

Neuroscience and Games

Neuroscience and Games
From the time that video games first entered popular culture there has been significant scientific interest in the possible effects of game playing at both the behavioral and neural levels.  And indeed, the scope and scale of changes to social conduct, developmental processes, perceptual abilities, and cognitive function that have been shown to arise as a result of video game play are indicative of a tool that strongly promotes neural plasticity and through this, is capable of modifying a wide variety of human abilities and behaviors.  However, although it is true that the majority of the work thus far has predominantly been in the games-->neuroscience direction (i.e. scientists assessing the effects of playing commercially available games on the brain and behavior), there is now increasing interest in moving in the opposite direction, neuroscience-->games (i.e. how can we utilize knowledge gleaned from psychology and neuroscience in the development of new games for positive impact?).  The four participants in this symposium will each briefly discuss their own work in this domain before opening up for a discussion amongst the participants and with the audience.  What do we know about the neuroscience of gaming?  What types of abilities are modified? What are the neural changes that underlie these changes?  And on the flip side, how can neuroscientific principles be utilized by game designers to maximize the influence of their games?
Richard Davidson, Adam Gazzaley, C. Shawn Green, Edward Hubbard

Moderated by Constance Steinkuehler. 


Discussants
avatar for Constance Steinkuehler

Constance Steinkuehler

Co-Director, Associate Professor, GLS, UW-Madison
Constance Steinkuehler is an Associate Professor in Digital Media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and co-directs the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery and chairs their annual GLS Conference. Her research is on cognition and learning in commercial entertainment games and games designed for impact. In 2011-2012, she served as Senior Policy Analyst in the White House Office of... Read More →

Speaker
avatar for Richard J Davidson

Richard J Davidson

William James and Vilas Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Dr Davidson's research is broadly focused on the neural bases of emotion and emotional style and methods to promote human flourishing including meditation and related contemplative practices. His studies have included persons of all ages from birth though old age and have also included individuals with disorders of emotion such as mood and anxiety disorders and autism, as well as expert meditation practitioners with tens of thousands of hours of... Read More →
avatar for Edward Hubbard

Edward Hubbard

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison
I find myself drawn to the spaces between established fields. Many different fields address questions of learning and education, but through different approaches and perspectives. By bringing these different groups together around these common questions, I hope to provide novel insights that neither field alone could provide. To do this, my research explores the boundaries between education and neuroscience. How does the brain support... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2013 10:30am - 11:30am
Old Madison

10:30am

ComputerCraft: Teaching Programming with Minecraft

Workshop:
ComputerCraft: Teaching Programming with Minecraft

Computer programming is an increasingly important skill for young people to learn. However, it remains fairly inaccessible to the majority of learners. ComputerCraft is an add-on that adds working computers and robots into the popular sandbox game Minecraft. These objects are programmable through the Lua scripting language and can be used to complete tasks inside the Minecraft world. Through ComputerCraft, programming becomes an immediate and useful skill, allowing students to accomplish more in Minecraft’s virtual space. This workshop models an introductory exercise in using ComputerCraft, aimed at educators and students. The players’ first challenge is to create a “Hello World” program. Next, players encounter robots known as “Turtles”, and learn to issue simple commands to them. Finally, players are challenged to program a Turtle to move along a predetermined path. As a result of these exercises, players gain an understanding of ComputerCraft, and by extension, computer programming in general.

Brendon Trombley, Don Miller


Speaker
avatar for Don Miller

Don Miller

Learning Designer, Institute of Play
avatar for Brendon Trombley

Brendon Trombley

Game Designer, Institute of Play
Brendon Trombley is a game designer, educator, and adventurer living in New York City. His passions involve games, technology, learning, travel, and food, and he tries to mix and match them whenever possible (be careful when combining food and technology!). | | Brendon is a graduate of the New Media Design program at Rochester Institute of Technology, where he trained in the principles of design in addition to a wide array of... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2013 10:30am - 11:30am
Class of '24

11:30am

Delicious Snack Break!
Thursday June 13, 2013 11:30am - 12:00pm
Great Hall

12:00pm

What’s Next in Studying Online Social Networking? Future Research Directions for Creative, DIY-Based Sites

Fireside Chat:
What’s Next in Studying Online Social Networking? Future Research Directions for Creative, DIY-Based Sites

Social networking sites (SNS) have garnered a great deal of media attention (and some research interest) in recent years. Among these, sites which focus on the making and sharing of media, or Do-It-Yourself (DIY) social networking forums, are surfacing as spaces with great potential for learning and as supportive, engaging communities. In this Workshop, we seek to map out a new agenda for research on these types of sites over the next decade. We bring together several scholars who have studied DIY-based social networking forums to engage with graduate students and interested researchers in identifying the key questions, themes, and distinguishable attributes that will propel study on this genre of sites into the next generation.

Deborah Fields, Sara Grimes, Alecia Magnifico, Jayne Lammers, Kimberley Gomez, Jen Scott Curwood


Speaker
avatar for Jen Scott Curwood

Jen Scott Curwood

Lecturer, English Education and Media Studies, The University of Sydney
avatar for Deborah Fields

Deborah Fields

Independent Research Consultant & Temporary Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital technologies in ways that bridge informal and formal learning contexts. She is the co-PI on the Kids' DIY Media Project (kidsdiymedia.com) aimed at identifying and... Read More →
avatar for Jayne C. Lammers

Jayne C. Lammers

Assistant professor, University of Rochester
affinity space research; online research methods; videogame and other digital literacies; writing; 21st century learning; adolescent literacies; English teacher preparation
avatar for Alecia Magnifico

Alecia Magnifico

Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Thursday June 13, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Capitol View

12:00pm

Implementation is a Bitch Too

This Hall of Failure session, ”Implementation is a Bitch Too”, will include the following:

Are We Washing Poop?: Unintended Consequences in Educational Game Design
What game developers and researchers know about what makes games enjoyable to children does not always transfer to educational contexts. This paper highlights potential pitfalls in creating a game that attempts to integrate learning with fun using a case study of Down With Food, a game that teaches upper elementary school students about the digestive system. We employed game mechanics and game design usability heuristics in our development of this iPad app. User testing revealed areas in which applying general game principles to an educational context created concerns, particularly with respect to the effects of schemas, visual misrepresentations, and usability difficulties. In detailing these unintended consequences, we hope to spur productive discussions about how to address the challenges of bridging the fields of game design and education.
Christine Bediones, Camille Macalinao, Benjamin Kal McDowd, Katerina Schenke, Cathy Tran, AnneMarie Conley

The Inevitability of Epic Fail: An Investigation of Implementation Problems Associated with Technology-Rich Research Innovations
Reviewing large-scale attempts to introduce new technology-based approaches to instruction yields many instances where researchers have used contemporary learning-science research and theory to design innovative, technology-based curricula that show substantial benefits to important instructional variables. Crucially, however, these results arise only when the project originators have close and direct involvement with teacher training and implementation. With evidence for limited long-term success, both educational psychologists and practicing educators must ask: “Why do technology-rich research innovations fail once researchers are no longer directly involved?” The authors aim to address this question in a way helpful to game-based learning researchers by presenting an example of failed implementation of a learning game paired with follow-up research on other instructional tools and methodologies. We propose three reasons why such innovations fail: 1) Fatal Mutation Due to Assimilation; 2) Loss of Fidelity; and 3) Failure to Thrive. Recommendations for addressing these issues follow.
Stephen Slota, Michael Young, Roger Travis

The balancing act: content, process, game design. Not only kids should learn from mistakes. 
The real practical world of making games for learning is an endless balancing act with lots of chefs in the kitchen including: content experts, gaming experts, sponsors, producers, designers, evaluators, artists, teachers, school administrators, and of course, the kids themselves. This presentation will use specific examples (and data!) from various Numedeon virtual world learning projects, including Whyville.net, to explore the complex mix of variables that contribute to perceived and well as measured success and failure in learning game design. 
James M. Bower

Dani Herro, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Dani Herro

Dani Herro

Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Learning, Clemson University
I am a former Instructional Technology Administrator and K-12 Technology Resource Teacher. My PhD work at UW-Madison involved studying teen learning using games and Web 2.0 apps. My current research involves writing and studying game and app design curricula in "formal" schooling, and computational thinking practices in teens designing apps. I love working with teachers and kids connecting technology to learning.

Speaker
avatar for James M. Bower

James M. Bower

CEO & Chairman of the Board, Numedeon Inc.
Dr. James M. Bower is the founder, Chairman of the Board and CEO for Numedeon Inc., which in 1999 launched Whyville.net as the first simulation-based gaming virtual learning worlds for tweens.  Whyville,net currently has more than 7.5 million registered users, and remains one of the few learning-based virtual worlds.  Dr. Bower is also a computational neurobiologists who has published more than 150 scientific articles, several... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Slota

Stephen Slota

Co-Founder, The Pericles Group, LLC
Steve (@steveslota) is an instructional design specialist and game design scientist at the University of Connecticut Health Center and a co-founder of The Pericles Group, LLC. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology: Cognition, Instruction, & Learning Technologies and has worked on a variety of game and instructional design projects with organizations including Arizona State University's Center for Games & Impact, Intel Corporation, and... Read More →
avatar for Cathy Tran

Cathy Tran

Researcher, UC Irvine
http://education.uci.edu/person/tran_c/tran_c_bio.php
avatar for Roger Travis

Roger Travis

Storrs, CT, US, University of Connecticut, and The Pericles Group, LLC
Only connect: ancient epic to video games; teacher to student; gamer to gamer; fan to fan; parent to child; human being to human being.
avatar for Michael Young

Michael Young

UConn
A situated cognitive view of learning on-the-fly in video game environments, through rich narratives, assessed through card play and understood as social participation, with an ecological psychology flare.


Thursday June 13, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Beefeaters

12:00pm

The Social

This individual papers session, ”The Social”, will include the following:

“I am sorry my friend, I love you, but I don’t trust you”: Social dynamics in a multiplayer collectible card game
This paper reports results pertaining to different social interactions among players of a popular multiplayer collectible card game, Vampire the Eternal Struggle (Vtes) over the course of a competitive game in a national championship. Video analysis of an 80-minute long single gameplay session with five players was analyzed by using inductive coding. Findings showed seven main categories of social interactions: social banter, strategies, out-of-game comments, reflection on gameplay, negotiations, clarifications/teaching, and praises. Relationships between these social interactions and time were also identified revealing dynamic nature of social interactions due to multiplayer aspect of the game. The practical and theoretical implications of the findings are discussed within the context of game design and research.
Selen Turkay, Sonam Adinolf, Devayani Tirthali

Online Communities Making a Mass Effect: From Affinity for Games to Identities for Professionalism
A great many adolescents and young adults participate heavily in online affinity communities around videogames. Committed contributors spend upwards of 20 hours each week researching, writing, and editing to contribute to wikis, fan fiction stories, and other literacy-rich online spaces. Many of these individuals hope to leverage their work toward careers as professionals in the gaming and publishing industries (Ochsner, 2013). Through ongoing case study interviews, this study explores the goals and trajectories that these writers form, using Miller and Slater’s (2000) expansive potential and expansive realization as lenses for analysis. As a part of a longer research trajectory, my goal is to reveal how educators and industry professionals can support young affinity group leaders as they work to establish and build careers as professionals.
Amanda Ochsner

Big data, interaction analysis, and everything in between
Reed Stevens

Liz Lawley, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Liz Lawley

Liz Lawley

Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology

Speaker
avatar for Amanda Ochsner

Amanda Ochsner

Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Southern California
RS

Reed Stevens

Evanston, Illinois, United States, Northwestern University
avatar for Selen Turkay

Selen Turkay

Games 4 Learning Institute


Thursday June 13, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

12:00pm

New Technologies, Digital Play, and Early Childhood: Ecological Perspectives

Symposium:
New Technologies, Digital Play, and Early Childhood: Ecological Perspectives

Culture, institutions, teachers, and parents are all contributing factors in a series of dynamic, transactional systems that influence children’s experiences with technology (e.g. Bronfenbrenner, 1979; Gee, 2003; Squire, 2011). This panel brings together academic researchers whose work examines young children’s experiences with media and technology within different contexts. Presentations include a discussion about children’s meaning-making and co-creation of culture through their mediated play, an examination of co-playing predictors and parent beliefs about the effects of video games on young children, and an exploration of the factors that influence how iPads are integrated in early childhood classrooms. Following the presentations, a moderator with both academic and industry research experience will lead a discussion regarding the implications of presentation findings and suggestions for the research and development of games for young users.

Sabrina Connell, Meagan Rothschild, Courtney Blackwell, Carla Fisher, Alexis Lauricella, Ellen Wartella


Speaker
avatar for Sabrina Connell

Sabrina Connell

Graduate Student, Northwestern University
An artist-turned-academic, my research interests broadly center on children, technology, and creative transmedia play. I'm specifically interested in joint media engagement between children and their parents during digital gameplay. I also explore issues related to the maker movement, children's creative media production, and their participation in affinity spaces and DIY-centered social networks. Prior to my current studies at Northwestern, I... Read More →
avatar for Carla Fisher

Carla Fisher

Founder & President, No Crusts Interactive
Carla Engelbrecht Fisher, Ed.D., is a game designer with a data obsession and the founder of No Crusts Interactive. Her work blends progressive educational philosophies, innovative game mechanics, and children’s curricular needs to create engaging interactive entertainment. Under her direction, No Crusts designedWilliamspurrrrg HD (iPad), Sesame Street: Elmo’s Musical Monsterpiece and Sesame... Read More →
avatar for Meagan Rothschild

Meagan Rothschild

Early Education Assessment and Design Specialist, WIDA
Kids, play, learning, media, music, general silliness.


Thursday June 13, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Old Madison

12:00pm

Let's Make a Game!

Workshop:
Let's Make a Game!

This workshop is geared towards non-programmers, particularly those who work with, or incorporate, games in their work so that they might better understand the process of making a game. In this workshop, participants will recreate the classic game PONG using Game Maker. This workshop seeks to teach participants how to make their own games so that they might better understand the game making process.

Dennis Ramirez


Speaker
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Technical Director, USC IMGD, Videogame Researcher


Thursday June 13, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Class of '24

1:00pm

Lunch
Our wonderful lunch is sponsored by the Data Recognition Corporation!

Thursday June 13, 2013 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Great Hall

1:00pm

Filament Tour! (full)

Sign up for the Filament Tour when you register!  (Spaces are limited.)

Transportation will be provided to and from, and you will get lunch, we promise!


Thursday June 13, 2013 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Filament Games

2:30pm

Literacy

This individual papers session, ”Literacy”, will include the following:

Online Role-Playing Games and Young Adult Literature
Drawing on theories of affinity spaces and traditions of online ethnographic research, this study seeks to understand the culture of physical, virtual, and blended spheres that adolescents inhabit. This paper highlights the ways in which youth use online role-playing games as a response to literature, such as The Hunger Games trilogy. Specifically, it considers how Tumblr, a microblogging site, offers a platform for readers to readily become writers and gamers. The analysis focuses on one young woman’s creative writing and role-playing processes over time, and includes a discussion of how games can shape young adults’ engagement with literature in and out of school contexts.
Jen Scott Curwood

Composition and Computation: Integrated Learning via Video Games
This Worked Example describes a three-course cluster offered during the 2012-13 academic year that uses video games to bridge the practices of written composition and computer programming. A group of 20 students enrolled in three courses—“Introduction to Computation,” “Introduction to Composition,” and a seminar course aimed at linking the concerns of the other two courses together—and spent the semester in an integrated learning environment that encouraged them to connect alphabetic writing with computer programming. By both analyzing and designing video games, these students were encouraged to see computational artifacts as expressive and rhetorical. This cluster will be offered again in the 2013-14 academic year. This Worked Example offers this course cluster as a way of using games to approach integrated learning projects, and it opens up a discussion about how to best use games in interdisciplinary teaching situations.
Jim Brown, Becca Tarsa, Andrea Arpaci-Dusseau, Deidre Stuffer

Professor to Producer of eBooks with computer games
A professor describes his experiences directing and producing a science fiction novel, in eBook format with computer games, featuring solar system science content, for sixth graders. The embedded computer games were designed to both move the plot forward and act as stealth assessments of comprehension and science content. The idea of this project emerged from a needs analysis of a 6th grade science teacher and science class from a private Christian school. The teacher suggested a strong need for better materials to teach highly spatial solar system content, including phases of the moon, eclipses, tilt of the earth relative to its orbit as the cause of seasons, etc. Our research group decided to create a novel that would be an exemplary piece of content, and an exemplar of web-based eBook with computer games to teach science and language arts content.
Glenn Smith, Mieke Caris, Jack Drobisz

Cathy Compton-Lilly, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Cathy Compton-Lilly

Cathy Compton-Lilly

Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison
Catherine Compton-Lilly is an Associate Professor in Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin Madison. She was an elementary school teacher for 18 years. She is the author of Reading Families: The Literate Lives of Urban Children (Teachers College Press, 2003), Confronting Racism, Poverty and Power (Heinemann, 2004), Rereading Families (Teachers College Press, 2007), the editor of Breaking the Silence (International Reading... Read More →

Speaker
avatar for Andrea Arpaci-Dusseau

Andrea Arpaci-Dusseau

Professor of Computer Sciences, UW-Madison
Dr. Andrea Arpaci-Dusseau is a Professor of Computer Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is an expert in file and storage systems, having published more than 80 papers in this area, co-advised nearly 20 Ph.D. students, and received nine best paper awards; for her research contributions, she was recognized as a UW-Madison Vilas Associate (2012-2014). Arpaci-Dusseau cares deeply about education and outreach; she served as... Read More →
JB

Jim Brown

Assistant Professor, English, University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Jen Scott Curwood

Jen Scott Curwood

Lecturer, English Education and Media Studies, The University of Sydney
avatar for Glenn Smith

Glenn Smith

Associate Professor, University of South Florida
Hello, | | I am an associate professor from University of South Florida in Instructional Technology. One of my research projects is to integrate eBooks and computer games to increase young people's motivation to read and to increase their comprehension. Really I want to create a whole new medium that uses the imagination of reading, but has the re-activeness of computer games. See http://imapbook.com/ I play tenor saxophone in a band. I... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2013 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Beefeaters

2:30pm

Narrative

This individual papers session, ”Narrative”, will include the following:

We Can't Just Go Shooting Asteroids Like Space Cowboys: The Role of Narrative in Immersive, Interactive Simulations for Learning
The purpose of this study is to explore how merging narrative, role-play, and immersive, interactive technology can support learners to participate in designerly STEM practices (e.g., posing questions, designing investigations, modeling data). Set in university pre-service teacher education courses, we contrast two problem-based units incorporating immersive, interactive projection. Elementary pre-service teachers (n=9) completed a three-day unit on arithmetic and geometric sequences embedded in a narrative of defending the Earth by testing a top-secret weapon to destroy asteroids. Secondary science pre-service teachers (n=8) completed a three-day unit that included an immersive simulation of the greenhouse effect, but lacked a narrative context. This study reports qualitative analysis of video-recorded interactions, examining how students engaged and participated. In the former, the narrative context pervaded interactions, and invited participation from students who rarely participated. In the latter, the students engaged as scientists, surfacing numerous questions and investigations. Students engaged mathematically/scientifically within the immersive environment.
Vanessa Svihla, Nicholas Kvam, Matthew Dahlgren, Jeffrey Bowles, Joe Kniss

The Role of Narrative in the Design of an Educational Game
This study explored how designers perceived and used narrative during the creation of an educational video game. A qualitative, ethnographic, single case study approach was used to collect and analyze data pertaining to the narrative design trajectory of the game design team as well as Citizen Science, the game artifact they produced. Findings suggest typologies that include fourteen key types of narrative perceptions and uses that were present in this case study. These types ranged from narrative as a unifying design document, to narrative as a reward mechanism. Implications include further study into uses of an overarching narrative summary design document and designing narrative for experiences in ways that heighten suspense and surprise. This study suggests that fruitful, related research may include exploring design language as a strong indicator of narrative perception and use, as well as the leveraging of emergent narratives as a rich resource for learning and assessment.
Christopher Blakesley

From Bounded Stories to Game-Infused Systems: The Game Designers Quill and How to Use it for Impact 
Although every era is met with the introduction of powerful technologies for entertainment and learning, videogames represent a new contribution binding the two and bearing the potential to create sustained engagement in a curricular drama where the player's knowledgeable actions shape an unfolding fiction within a designed world. We have been building game-infused narratives for learning over the last decade, and found narrative to be central to this work. At its core, we evolved a theory known as transformational play. At its core, transformational play involves an experiential state in which the player is positioned as a story protagonist who must employ particular understandings to transform a problem-based fictional context and ultimately themselves. Constructing a game-based transformational play story has the potential to produce strong engagement within a bounded context in which we can control the "anatomy of choice" (Salen & Zimmerman, 2004) to ensure the consequences are pedagogically illuminative. However, central to our current theory of change is to expand this vision of impact games to think of the medium as on-going services that support multiple game-infused experiences and real-world extensions where core lessons are brought outside the fictional gaming context. These interactions, which take place around the game, act as game extensions and provide the game a larger life and impact. This meta-game experience is what games scholar James Gee referred to as "Big G," and it acts as a force multiplier on the impact potential of bounded game-play experiences. Big "G" game infrastructures are open-ended and seamlessly integrate the small "g" games into a larger, flexible "meta-game" structure and affinity space that fosters user-driven extensions and adaptations in support of real-world goals and outcomes. It is with Big "G" components that we transform isolated experiences within a game into a dynamic interaction to enable learning to be applied and extended beyond the walls of the magic circle. In this presentation, we will discuss the emerging theory, outlining the distinction between small "g" and Big "G" games and how it informs narrative storytelling through games--especially when the goal is sustained and scaled impact. 
Sasha Barab


Lee Sheldon, Discussant


Discussants
LS

Lee Sheldon

Associate Professor, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Associate Professor | | Department of Communication and Media | | Games and Simulation Arts and Sciences | | Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute | | Principal Investigator: Emergent Reality Lab | | Author: Character Development and Storytelling for Games | | Author: The Multiplayer Classroom: Designing Coursework as a Game | | | | Lee Sheldon is a professional game writer and designer, and an Associate Professor in the Games... Read More →

Speaker
avatar for Sasha Barab

Sasha Barab

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
My work involves the seamless integration of bounded games (where players can fail safely, receive embedded assessment, and have consequentiality in the confines of a fictional world) and larger, flexible 'meta-game' structures and affinity spaces that foster user-driven extensions and adaptations in support of real-world goals ad outcomes.
avatar for Chris Blakesley

Chris Blakesley

Director, Multimedia & Interactivity, The Jack Welch Management Institute
Designer and researcher of immersive learning environments through the integration of narrative, games and mobile tools. Currently I direct multimedia and interactive initiatives for a 100% Online EMBA program.
VS

Vanessa Svihla

Assistant Professor, University of New Mexico
Design & Learning.


Thursday June 13, 2013 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Inn Wisconsin

2:30pm

Science

This individual papers session, ”Science”, will include the following:

Meaningful Play: The Intersection of Videogames and Environmental Policy
Interactive multi-player simulation games have the potential to provide a more mature and statistically accurate approach to help better understand human behavior in relation to local environments and situated contexts. This could be used as a tool to better inform policy and research around environmental issues such as sustainability, food, and climate change. The [removed for blind review] at the [removed for blind review] is currently working on an ecological simulation game, Trails Forward. In this game, three players: a lumber worker, a conservationist, and a housing developer, all work and compete within an accurate model of the Vilas county landscape. Trails Forward provides a template of how play in a simulated environment can inform our understandings of human behavior given real-world privileges and restrictions.
Keari Bell-Gawne

The Radix Endeavor: Where STEM standards meet MMOs
MMOGs provide an interesting setting for inquiry-based STEM learning, given their virtual world-based environment, simulated systems, and social nature. New content standards in math and biology are putting more emphasis on learning processes such as model-based reasoning, communicating scientific ideas, and collaborative problem-solving. An educational MMO such as The Radix Endeavor can be just the right fit for incorporating many of these standards into an engaging world, if the designs are carefully thought out and tested. In this paper, the authors describe the recent changes in state standards, how the new MMOG incorporates these skills, and what evidence from initial user testing has shown about the project concept.
Susannah Gordon-Messer, Jody Clarke-Midura, Louisa Rosenheck

Supporting Social-Emotional Development in Collaborative Inquiry Games for K-3 Science Learning
While games for science learning show considerable promise, they tend not to focus on the youngest students. We are engaged in a project to create and evaluate a series of games for science learning for students in Kindergarten through grade 3. These games address a range of educational goals: to help students understand targeted science principles, develop scientific inquiry skill, and deal with situations that call for social-emotional skill. In two of our games, Beanstalk and Teeter Totter Go, players alternate between problem-solving activities and inquiry activities integrated in a single narrative context. To support social-emotional development, players must collaborate with, and sometimes seek help from, in-game characters. The main contribution of the work is a design for science games for young children that synergistically addresses scientific inquiry, social-emotional development, and science content learning. The games serve as platforms for research into how best to support this synergy.
Vincent Aleven, Steven Dow, Christel Michael, Stevens Scott, Carolyn Rosé, Mitra Fathollahpour, Amos Glenn, Julia Brynn Flynn, Erik Harpstead, Ken Koedinger

Matthew Berland, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Matthew Berland

Matthew Berland

University of Wisconsin–Madison

Speaker
VA

Vincent Aleven

Pittsburgh, PA, USA, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Keari Bell-Gawne

Keari Bell-Gawne

Research, Games Learning Society
I'm passionate about connecting new paradigms of learning to the environmental movement. How might unique characteristics about games (e.g. massively multiplayer, modding, immersion) be harnessed in a way to better understand, and say new things about the state of human interaction with the environment? I am also immensely passionate about gender, race and sexuality. How are these constructed and maintained in game spaces? How do game spaces... Read More →
avatar for Michael Christel

Michael Christel

Teaching Professor, Carnegie Mellon University, ETC
As faculty at the Entertainment Technology Center, I am passionate about the ETC graduate students. They are creative, diligent, exceptional game designers, developers, evaluators. I enjoy working on games for learning and games for health with their notable contributions.
avatar for Susannah Gordon-Messer

Susannah Gordon-Messer

Education Content Manager, The Education Arcade, MIT
The Radix Endeavor, a multiplayer online game for high school STEM learning. radixendeavor.org
avatar for Erik Harpstead

Erik Harpstead

Pittsburgh, PA, USA, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Louisa Rosenheck

Louisa Rosenheck

Research Manager, MIT Education Arcade
Louisa is a Research Manager in the MIT Scheller Teacher Education Program. She manages the design, content, and development of educational games and simulations to be used with middle and high school students. She also oversees the research done on these projects exploring how games can be used most effectively in both formal and informal educational settings. Most recently Louisa has held the role of lead designer on The Radix Endeavor, a... Read More →
SS

Scott Stevens

Professor, Entertainment Technology Center, Carnegie Mellon University


Thursday June 13, 2013 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Old Madison

2:30pm

Ninja Gaiden Black, or How to Remove Tutorial Boredom

Well-Played:
Ninja Gaiden Black, or How to Remove Tutorial Boredom

Ninja Gaiden Black (Xbox, 2005) is personally my favorite teaching game. A Beat-em-up of legendary difficulty, the game’s tutorial doesn’t tell you how to move, or even jump – And the game is all the better for it. The game teaches complex, acrobatic moves within minutes, using a combination of intuitive controls, player experimentation, and enemies that mimic the player. This paper explores Ninja Gaiden Black’s approach to the tutorial.

Jason Mathias


Speaker

Thursday June 13, 2013 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Capitol View

2:30pm

Designing for Productive Failure

Workshop:
Designing for Productive Failure

Much of the appeal of educational games stems from the notion that players are persistent despite frequent failure and the possibility of re-producing that persistence in education. Our symposium brings together researchers in the humanities, cognitive science, and educational psychology as well as industry producers to discuss what makes failure appealing, why failure relates to learning, and how to design for productive failure. We explain the paradox of why we seek out failure in video games when it makes us feel bad. Confusion, in particular, was found to facilitate learning when experimentally induced via the presentation of system breakdowns, contradictory information, and false feedback in a learning task with computer agents. In another study, we illustrate how individual differences in motivation affect responses to failure. We hope to generate discussions on how research can inform design and provide an example of a math program strategically designed to foster productive failure.

Cathy Tran, Blair Lehman, David Dockterman, Jesper Juul, Sidney D'Mello, Art Graesser


Speaker
avatar for David Dockterman

David Dockterman

Chief Architect, Learning Sciences, Scholastic
I'm also an adjunct member of the faculty at the Harvard Graduate School of Eduction in the Technology, Innovation, and Education program. I teach a course called Innovation by Design: Projects in Educational Technology.
avatar for Jesper Juul

Jesper Juul

New York University Game Center
I am a video game theorist.
avatar for Blair Lehman

Blair Lehman

Doctoral Student, University of Memphis
avatar for Cathy Tran

Cathy Tran

Researcher, UC Irvine
http://education.uci.edu/person/tran_c/tran_c_bio.php


Thursday June 13, 2013 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Class of '24

3:30pm

Delicious Snack Break!
Thursday June 13, 2013 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Great Hall

4:00pm

Analog Role-Playing Games

This individual papers session, ”Analog Role-Playing Games”, will include the following:

Reacting to the Past: Role Playing in the Classroom
Reacting to the Past (RTTP) is a mature role-playing framework that allows non-gamers to frame their area of expertise into a dynamic scenario. This workshop will facilitate the RTTP creation process as well as highlight several published scenarios.
Andrew Peterson, Nicolas Proctor

The Narrative Potential of Tabletop Role-Playing Games
This paper discusses the unique way tabletop role-playing games generate stories for their players, and how creative writing instructors may use these methods to teach fiction writing techniques to beginning writers. The author explains his theory of incremental storytelling, a methodology by which role-playing games provide an ideal model for students to learn the craft of fiction writing in small, discrete bits that, in aggregate, create something much greater than their constituent parts. This progressive approach puts students in immediate contact with each others’ writing throughout the entire creative process and opens space for critical discussions about the fictional characters and the shared world they create.
W. Trent Hergenrader

Packing for Another Planet: Learning Scientific Methodology Through Alternative Reality Gaming
We use an alternative reality game (ARG) to teach a wide variety of STEM topics as a planetary exploration activity. The program is organized as a professional development workshop for middle and high school science educators and has included teachers from many fields; life sciences, physical sciences, and technology. Teachers are grouped into teams of scientists and charged with designing a scientific mission of discovery to another planet. The game culminates in a competition for funding. The ARG relies on the combined expertise of all participants and illustrates the highly interdisciplinary nature of science. The game combines fieldwork, laboratory experiments, and directed readings, as well as independent research. User reviews from before and after the use of the teaching ARG indicate that participants were more engaged and found it easier to apply large amounts of data and concepts when presented through a cohesive storyline with a defined goal.
Heather Graham, Eric Church, Christopher House

David Simkins, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for David Simkins

David Simkins

Assistant Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology
David is fascinated by the potential of games, particularly role playing as a tool for facilitating and encouraging learning. He is also fascinated by the constraints and affordances of different games as tools for learning. Fortunately, he is ale to study games, write about games, teach about games, and make games for non-commercial purposes without starving. He is an assistant professor at RIT's School of Interactive Games and Media, and a... Read More →

Speaker
avatar for Trent Hergenrader

Trent Hergenrader

Rochester, NY, United States, Rochester Institute of Technology
My primary area of research is using games and gaming in English courses, and more specifically using role-playing games to teach fiction writing. I am an Assistant Professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology.
avatar for Andrew Peterson

Andrew Peterson

Instructional Technologist, Ferris State University
Game Based Learning has been a passion of mine since before it had a name. While studying for my Master's degree in Curriculum and Instruction, I learned that it was a "real" pedagogy. I've presented about the similarities in game design and curriculum design at both GenCon and Lilly North Conferences.
avatar for Nicolas Proctor

Nicolas Proctor

Professor of History, Simpson College
I'm the chair of the Reacting to the Past Editorial Board. It is an innovative series of historical role playing games designed for undergraduate instruction. Nine games are currently in print and dozens more are in the development process. RTTP games are currently being used at around 300 colleges and universities.


Thursday June 13, 2013 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Old Madison

4:00pm

Democracy

This individual papers session, ”Democracy”, will include the following:

There is a reason they are still called games: The affordances and constraints of iCivics games for democratic education
Videogames, along with social media and online learning environments (e.g., MOOCs), are the most recent technological advancements viewed as an educational panacea and force for democracy. However, as with previous technologies (e.g., educational radio, film), these mediums have particular affordances and constraints as educational environments and tools for democratic education. This paper presents results from a study of the content, design, and potential for four iCivics games (e.g., Do I Have a Right) to meet the goals of democratic education. Specifically, we focus on the design of the games as an educational context, the accuracy of the content, and if they present best case, fair hearing, of competing points of view on issues deemed controversial in contemporary society. There are always some constraints with new media and implementation in classrooms, so we hope this study helps to continue the conversation between democratic educators, game designers, and educational researchers.
Jeremy Stoddard, Christine Nemacheck, Angela Banks

How to Do Things With Rules: Game Designing Governance
From the Roman ludi to strategic military planning and training and serious games for civic education, games and politics have always been closely intertwined. But with today's discourses around "nudging" and "gamification", we see a genuinely new form emerging: game design used as a tool to produce regulatory outcomes like healthier citizens or a higher voter turnout. As this talk will argue, this overlooks serious potential side effects, and more importantly, fails to grasp the true potential of game design for policy-making. For this requires us to see the deep structural similarity and difference of policy-making and game design, and to extend our understanding of politics beyond public service provision and regulatory outcomes towards designing our polis for collective well-being.
Sebastian Deterding

Empirical Research on the Impact of Morgan's Raid 
We present an empirical evaluation of Morgan's Raid, an educational video game about Civil War history in Indiana. The game is designed for integration with Indiana fourth grade curriculum on state history. A qualitative study was conducted with six elementary school students, and the body of data included field notes and pre- and post-intervention interviews. Three major findings emerged: after playing the game, students exhibited increased knowledge and understanding of the historical context and geography; playing the game increased students' empathy for both soldiers and civilians in the 1860s; and the constructive nature of learning led to unexpected interpretations of the game. These findings have implications for the design of serious games as well as future research.
Paul Gestwicki, Lyle Franklin, Ronald Morris

Diana Hess, Discussant


Discussants
Speaker
avatar for Sebastian Deterding

Sebastian Deterding

Chief Something Something, coding conduct
An aspiring architect in the cathedral of human understanding. Designer and researcher working on playful and gameful design.
avatar for Paul Gestwicki

Paul Gestwicki

Associate Professor, Ball State University
I am in the Computer Science department, where I teach advanced programming as well as game design and development. I regularly form multidiscplinary teams of undergraduates to work with community partners on serious game projects.
RM

Ronald Morris

Professor; Presidential Immersive Learning Fellow, Ball State University Department of History
I am passionate about providing curriculm materials to elementary social studies teachers, providing digital resources to enrich elementary social studies classrooms for students, and creating digital materials to help cultural institutions work with families.
avatar for Jeremy Stoddard

Jeremy Stoddard

Associate Professor, College of William & Mary


Thursday June 13, 2013 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Beefeaters

4:00pm

Sports Games: Reading, Writing, & Statistics

This individual papers session, ”Sports Games:  Reading, Writing, & Statistics”, will include the following:

Assessing the Common Core State Standards in Reading With The Sports Network 2
Classroom, Inc. (CI) developed and piloted an 8th grade learning game targeting the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in Reading. CI built on 20 years experience using workplace simulations to teach literacy, and developed The Sports Network 2 (TSN-2), leveraging advances in gaming and assessment. TSN-2 puts students in the role of managing director of a sports media company, giving them reading and workplace problems to solve. Piloted in 2012 with over 400 New York City and Chicago students and their teachers, teachers agreed that the game was strongly connected to the CCSS, and students reported being engaged and learning from it. Assessments on the CCSS from within the game showed modest student performance; scores were strongly correlated with scores from a standardized reading test, the Measures of Academic Progress. This research provides early validation for an approach within a game to assess reading skills based on CCSS.
Jane Canner, Mary Schearer, Nicole Guagliardi

Fantasy Football: A Touchdown for Undergraduate Statistics Education
This paper describes a course in introductory statistics and data analysis techniques taught thru the lens of fantasy football. The game's appeal and its natural applicability to empirical analysis sparked strong interest in topics that would otherwise be abstract and are traditionally unattractive; and evidence suggests that the course was a success. Furthermore, there was no correlation between fantasy experience and course achievement, indicating that fantasy football is an accessible avenue toward statistical concept learning. However, issues of the authenticity of learning activities to fantasy football gameplay arose, and may have dampened initial enthusiasm among students who were already experienced fantasy football managers. In total, fantasy football is concluded to be an engaging, active, and immersive classroom application of statistical analysis, and a powerful tool toward statistics education reform.
Benjamin Motz

Fantasy Wrestling: Role-Playing Games and Professional Wrestling
This paper explores a Fantasy Wrestling Federation (FWF) that is part of a larger WWE fan community. Although more like a text-based RPG than traditional fantasy sports, it does carry the hallmarks of competitive fandom, just as more traditional fantasy sports, including learning, play, and engagement as described by Halverson and Halverson (2008). Just like professional wrestling, the fantasy wrestling mixes fantasy and reality, giving wrestlers real attributes and real moves while creating fantasy and fiction from the cannon of wrestling. As will be seen, professional wrestling boasts a long tradition in the United States existing in some form in the late 19th century and in a state more like its modern form by the early 1930s. In this paper, I hope to explore and understand what the players learn from their participation and how these experiences can influence their larger choices and experiences outside the FWF.
Crystle Martin

Rich Halverson, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Richard Halverson

Richard Halverson

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I'm a Professor at UW-Madison, and I study how technologies can and do transform teaching and learning in and out of schools. I work with the Wisconsin Collaborative Education Research Network (the Network); the Collaborative Assessment of Leadership for Learning project, and the Games, Learning and Society Research Center.

Speaker
avatar for Jane Canner

Jane Canner

New York, NY, United States, Classroom, Inc.
Professionally, I am passionate about improving the educational experience and thus the outcomes for urban students, so that they can look forward to leading productive and fulfilling lives. I believe strongly that we can't just assert that certain educational strategies or approaches work for students; we need to test them out and provide evidence that they work. Not surprisingly, I believe that games hold great potential for doing both... Read More →
avatar for Crystle Martin

Crystle Martin

Researcher, University of California, Irvine
avatar for Benjamin Motz

Benjamin Motz

Senior Lecturer & Director of Pedagogy, Indiana University Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences
I lead an academic double life. By day, I'm a college instructor, passionate about new pedagogies, evidence-based teaching, and research on classroom learning. I frequently wear argyle sweater vests. By night, I'm a neuroscientist, studying basic mechanisms of neural communication and cognitive processing using electroencephalography. I also dig fantasy football a whole bunch, and I've been teaching an introductory applied statistics course... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2013 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

4:00pm

A Sense of Wonder through Planes of Reality: Playing Gorogoa

Well-Played: A Sense of Wonder through Planes of Reality: Playing Gorogoa

With this presentation, I will engage in a close reading of the experience of playing Gorogoa, a video game being independently developed by Jason Roberts. It's a game where the world is the puzzle that you solve, so I'm going to approach the experience from the perspective of how it encourages exploring layered planes of reality.  Gorogoa is a work in progress, with a playable demo and  a targeted release date of late 2013 / early 2014. As such, I will be able to play through the entire demo live to help illustrate and interpret how the game enables players to learn its mechanics, developing a literacy and mastery of the gameplay experience, and creating a sense of wonder.

Drew Davidson


Speaker
avatar for Drew Davidson

Drew Davidson

Director, Entertainment Technology Center at CMU
Drew Davidson is a professor, producer and player of interactive media. His background spans academic, industry and professional worlds and he is interested in stories across texts, comics, games and other media. He is the Director of the Entertainment Technology Center at Carnegie Mellon University and the Founding Editor of ETC Press and its Well Played series and journal. All things Drew can be found... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2013 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Capitol View

4:00pm

Designing and Building Mobile, Locative Games with ARIS

Workshop:
Designing and Building Mobile, Locative Games with ARIS

This proposed workshop will introduce participants to ARIS, a platform that allows non-programmers to create their own mobile, locative augmented reality games and activities.  Through demonstration, hands-on participation, and reflective discussion, participants in this one-hour workshop will leave with: 1) connections between situated learning, mobile technologies, place, design, and games, 2) possibilities of using augmented reality games to create new learning opportunities with mobile devices, and 3) their own sample ARIS game that includes both narrative and data-gathering elements. This proposal discusses the ARIS platform and its theoretical foundations as well as the goals and activities of this ARIS workshop.

Garrett Smith, John Martin, David Gagnon, Breanne Litts, Owen Gottlieb


Speaker
avatar for David Gagnon

David Gagnon

Director, Field Day Lab, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I have a sweet spot for directing small design teams to approach big challenges. I like thinking and making real world products that are inspired by all the cool stuff kids like these days. I love seeing other people find themselves by making something new. I also am a bit of a baking addict, still trying to nail the traditional sour dough baguette in a wood fired oven.
avatar for Owen Gottlieb

Owen Gottlieb

Ph.D. Candidate, NYU; Founder & Director, ConverJent, Converjent/NYU
Rabbi Owen Gottlieb is a Jim Joseph Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate in Education and Jewish Studies at NYU where he specializes in Digital Media and Games for Learning. He is the founder and director of ConverJent which is dedicated to Jewish games for learning. He is passionate about games and digital media for cultural heritage and cultural futures, digital narratives, and mobile place-based Augmented Reality Games for teaching history. He... Read More →
avatar for Breanne Litts

Breanne Litts

University of Wisconsin-Madison
I am a Ph.D. student in Curriculum & Instruction with a Digital Media focus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I currently serve as a project assistant for Dr. Erica Halverson on an NSF funded project researching makerspaces and learning through making. Additionally, I am a researcher in the newly founded Mobile Learning Incubator in Academic Technology at UW-Madison. Broadly, my scholarly interests are focused around the intersection of... Read More →
avatar for John Martin

John Martin

Learning Consultant, UW-Madison
Integrating technology to increase learning in higher education in various roles since 1998, John currently teaches and develops socioculturally-rich teaching and learning practices at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His doctoral research in Curriculum and Instruction broadly considered the learning affordances of video games, and specifically focused on learner-designed place-based mobile games. Drawing on a background and interest in... Read More →


Thursday June 13, 2013 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Class of '24

5:00pm

Marquee Dinner
Thursday June 13, 2013 5:00pm - 8:00pm
Tripp Deck

8:00pm

Arcade
Thursday June 13, 2013 8:00pm - Friday June 14, 2013 12:00am
Tripp Commons
 
Friday, June 14
 

8:30am

Registration Opens
Friday June 14, 2013 8:30am - 9:00am
Annex Room

9:00am

Breakfast and Keynote (Constance Steinkuehler)
Games for Impact: Global Challenges, Local Initiatives

Games have recently emerged as a tool for addressing global challenges ranging from STEM education to fitness to scientific discovery. A 2009 National Academies of Science report concluded that games have great potential to catalyze new approaches to science education and assessment. In the United States, the Presidential Active Lifestyle Award (PALA+) recently added exergaming to its inventory of ways for young people to track and increase their physical activity levels. And recent scientific discoveries through innovative gaming platforms like FoldIt have highlighted the ways in which game mechanics can enable collective problem solving. US President Barack Obama himself issued his own call to action,  “I’m calling for investments in educational technology that will help create… educational software that’s as compelling as the best video game. I want you guys to be stuck on a video game that’s teaching you something other than just blowing something up.”

A growing number of universities around the globe have risen to the challenge, establishing programs in games for impact research, design and development.  Robust academic communities such as Games for Change, Games for Health, and Games+Learning+Society have already mobilized around the idea that games can indeed be leveraged against tough challenges that face our many nations, ranging from retention and innovation in science education to improving health care and well-being to making new discoveries in high impact areas like the structure of proteins. Federal and philanthropic support for this work has accelerated over the past decade, and even the commercial games industry is showing significant interest in new markets related to games for good.

In this presentation, Steinkuehler will detail the current state of the field of games for impact, highlighting new collaborations and joint initiatives across institutions that promise to catalyze progress in the domain. What are current trends in this growing market? What specific example technologies have emerged and what does research on them suggest? How might the US and other countries best leverage this growing momentum in using games as a way to do good in the world?

Dr. Steinkuehler will be introduced by Dr. Eric Klopfer, President of the Learning Games Network. 

Speaker
avatar for Constance Steinkuehler

Constance Steinkuehler

Co-Director, Associate Professor, GLS, UW-Madison
Constance Steinkuehler is an Associate Professor in Digital Media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and co-directs the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery and chairs their annual GLS Conference. Her research is on cognition and learning in commercial entertainment games and games designed for impact. In 2011-2012, she served as Senior Policy Analyst in the White House Office of... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2013 9:00am - 10:00am
Great Hall

10:00am

Educational Game Arcade

This education arcade will include the following projects: 

The Radix Endeavor
Louisa Rosenheck, Susannah Gordon-Messer, Jody Clarke-Midura, Eric Klopfer

Quantum Spectre
Teon Edwards, Erin Bardar, Jodi Asbell-Clarke, J.L. Larsen

Impulse
Erin Bardar, Jodi Asbell-Clarke, Teon Edwards, J.L. Larsen

Monsterismus: Recursively Relevant CS Game Design
Don Davis, Matthew Berland, Timothy Yuen

Learning English Vocabulary: A Choose-Your-Own-Adventure Graphic Novel
Ira Fay

World of Physics- Video Game Series
Kevin Miklasz

Fair Play: Eliciting perspective-taking through gameplay
Dennis Ramirez, Clem Samson-Samuel, Sarah Chu, Belinda Gutierrez, John Karczewski, Adam Wiens, Justin Smith, Sterling Pempe, Allison Salmon, Greg Vaughan, Brian Pelletier, Jake Ruesch, Jason Palmer, Molly Carnes, Kurt Squire, Erin Robinson, Christine Pribbenow, Angela Byars-Winston, Julia Savoy, Jennifer Sheridan, Eve Fine, Susan Millar   

Understanding Environmentally Friendly Drilling through Serious Games
Luis Gaitan, Hannah Gerber

Practice Government in Action
David McCool, Chris Parsons

Learning Subject-Verb Agreement in English: An Archaeological Adventure
Ira Fay

Covalence: An Organic Chemistry Puzzle Game
Jason Mathias

Tenacity 
Aaron Bahr, Mike Beall, Jeff DeWitt, Les Dorschied, Jonathan Elmergreen, Reza Farajian, Lisa Flook, Devon Klompmaker, Daniel Levinson, V. Elizabeth Owen, Jason Palmer, Brian Pelletier, Sterling Pempe, Jake Ruesch, Kevin Schilder, Stefan Slater, Amy Smith, Allison Salmon, Rick Solis, Greg Vaughan, Adam Wiens, Richard Davidson, Constance Steinkuehler, Kurt Squire

Crystals of Kaydor
Aaron Bahr, Mike Beall, Jeff DeWitt, Les Dorschied, Jonathan Elmergreen, Reza Farajian, Lisa Flook, Devon Klompmaker, Daniel Levinson, V. Elizabeth Owen, Jason Palmer, Brian Pelletier, Sterling Pempe, Jake Ruesch, Kevin Schilder, Stefan Slater, Amy Smith, Allison Salmon, Rick Solis, Greg Vaughan, Adam Wiens, Richard Davidson, Constance Steinkuehler, Kurt Squire

QUANDARY: Developing Ethical Thinking Skills Through Play
Peter Stidwill, Scot Osterweil, Amelia Peterson

New Games and Tools on BrainPOP's GameUp 
BrainPOP's GameUp Team 

NeuroNet Moto: Learning Enrichment for the Kinect 
Jonathan Rowe, Zach Ezzell

Chaired by Wade Berger


Discussants
avatar for Wade Berger

Wade Berger

Graduate Student Research Assistant, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Speaker
avatar for Jonathan

Jonathan

Managing Director, NeuroNet Learning
Movement-based learning | Computer vision | Speech and motion analysis | Simulation
avatar for Jodi Asbell-Clarke

Jodi Asbell-Clarke

Director, TERC
I direct a team of game designers, researchers, and learning scientists who live and work on the edge of science and play.
avatar for Erin Bardar

Erin Bardar

Education Materials Director, EdGE at TERC
As Education Materials Director for EdGE at TERC, my role includes elements of game design, outreach, and curriculum development. I work with the design team to help ensure that beneath all the fun, the games we develop are grounded in science that is both accurate and aligned with high school standards. My work also includes collaborating with teachers to develop bridge activities that help students connect the content knowledge and skills... Read More →
avatar for Mike Beall

Mike Beall

Project Leader, Learning Games Network
I am a Game Designer, Project Leader, and Artist working with the Learning Games Network and Games Learning Society. In addition to direct involvement with design and development of many GLS/LGN games, I also work with local schools and community centers where I engage with University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty and students to conduct playtests, interviews, and focus group tests.
avatar for Matthew Berland

Matthew Berland

University of Wisconsin–Madison
avatar for Richard J Davidson

Richard J Davidson

William James and Vilas Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Dr Davidson's research is broadly focused on the neural bases of emotion and emotional style and methods to promote human flourishing including meditation and related contemplative practices. His studies have included persons of all ages from birth though old age and have also included individuals with disorders of emotion such as mood and anxiety disorders and autism, as well as expert meditation practitioners with tens of thousands of hours of... Read More →
avatar for Teon Edwards

Teon Edwards

Lead Designer, EdGE at TERC
Games for learning; | Play for learning; | Using the digital to engage people in the world around them; | Wait-time learning; | Tacit learning in STEM based games; | Zoombinis (Hip, hip, Zoombinis!!!)
RF

Reza Farajian

Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Wisconsin-Madison
IF

Ira Fay

CEO - Fay Games, Asst. Prof. of Game Design - Hampshire College
LG

Luis Gaitan

Lead Video Game Designer, Epic Software
Luis Gaitan is a 3D artist, and video game designer from Houston, TX. Luis started designing video games at the age of 14 and created his first 3D renders and animations as a junior in Carl Wunsche Sr. High School’s Animation Pathway. During his time at Wunsche High School, Luis landed an internship with epic Software and following his internship was hired by the company as a 3D artist and video game designer. Now a junior at Sam Houston... Read More →
avatar for Hannah Rox Gerber

Hannah Rox Gerber

Assistant Professor of Literacy, Sam Houston State Uiversity
avatar for Susannah Gordon-Messer

Susannah Gordon-Messer

Education Content Manager, The Education Arcade, MIT
The Radix Endeavor, a multiplayer online game for high school STEM learning. radixendeavor.org
EK

Eric Klopfer

Cambridge, MA, United States, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Dr. Eric Klopfer is Professor and Director of the Scheller Teacher Education Program and The Education Arcade at MIT. Klopfer’s research focuses on the development and use of computer games and simulations for building understanding of science and complex systems. His research explores simulations and games on desktop computers as well as mobile devices like smartphones and tablets. Klopfer’s work combines the construction of new software... Read More →
avatar for James Larsen

James Larsen

EdGE at TERC
I'm interested in leveraging games and play to get people outside.
DM

David McCool

President, Muzzy Lane Software
KM

Kevin Miklasz

Director of Digital Learning, Iridescent
The science research interests of Kevin Miklasz are using physics and engineering to understand why organisms look the way they do. His PhD dissertation is on how size and shape effect the physics of small algae. He currently works for Iridescent as Director of Digital Learning and works on more projects than he can list on both hands. He plays and designs games, and also design a few myself. He thinks and reads about the future of... Read More →
avatar for Scot Osterweil

Scot Osterweil

Scot Osterweil is Creative Director of the Education Arcade in the MIT Comparative Media Studies Program. He has designed award-winning games in both academic and commercial environments, focusing on what is authentically playful in challenging academic subjects. Designs include the acclaimed Zoombinis series (math and logic), Vanished: The MIT/Smithsonian Curated Game(environmental science), Labyrinth (math), Kids Survey Network (data and... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Owen

Elizabeth Owen

Director, Learning & Data Science, Age of Learning
Elizabeth Owen holds a PhD in Digital Media (School of Education) from UW-Madison, focused on game-based learning analytics. Currently the Director of Learning and Data Science at Age of Learning, she's committed to optimizing adaptive learning systems through applied machine learning. Previously a researcher and data scientist with GlassLab Games (EA campus), LRNG, and Metacog, her doctoral work is rooted at the Games+Learning+Society Center... Read More →
avatar for Brian Pelletier

Brian Pelletier

Creative Director & Head of Development, Games Learning Society Center & Learning Games Network
I'm a professional artist and appreciate the comic book art form for storytelling. I have been developing video games for 21 years. I love creating story through art and games provided me the opportunity to bring artwork to life in an interactive story. After developing and shipping 16 AAA retail games that my kids could not play I became passionate about creating games for them that would be fun and meaningful. I'm able to follow that passion... Read More →
avatar for Scott Price

Scott Price

Director of Product, BrainPOP
Scott Price has spent his professional life helping people learn through play, and play with their learning.  He is Director of Product with BrainPOP, focusing on games, playful assessment, and helping teachers use games.  Prior to BrainPOP he produced Gamestar Mechanic with E-Line Media, produced games with the Institute of Play, ran QA on 8 titles with Gamelab, and ran IT for Exploration Summer Programs in Boston.  He rarely turns down a... Read More →
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Technical Director, USC IMGD, Videogame Researcher
avatar for Louisa Rosenheck

Louisa Rosenheck

Research Manager, MIT Education Arcade
Louisa is a Research Manager in the MIT Scheller Teacher Education Program. She manages the design, content, and development of educational games and simulations to be used with middle and high school students. She also oversees the research done on these projects exploring how games can be used most effectively in both formal and informal educational settings. Most recently Louisa has held the role of lead designer on The Radix Endeavor, a... Read More →
avatar for Allison Salmon

Allison Salmon

Lead of Research Tool Development, Games + Learning + Society and the Learning Games Network
Allison Salmon is a Lead Software Engineer at the Learning Games Network and Games + Learning + Society Center in Madison, Wisconsin. At LGN she leads development on the ADAGE project, an open source platform for collecting and analyzing in-game data for assessing evidence of learning. Before joining LGN Allison worked as a technology programmer in the commercial game industry. During her years with Raven Software and Activision she shipped seven... Read More →
avatar for Clem Samson-Samuel

Clem Samson-Samuel

Game Designer/Graduate Student, Games Learning Society Center & Learning Games Network
A graduate student in curriculum and instruction, Clem Samson-Samuel has worked as a game designer for 12 years, including eight years with Raven Software during which he worked on seven triple-A games. Samson-Samuel holds a B.S. in computer science from UW-Madison.
AS

Amy Smith

Curriculum Designer and PhD Candidate in School of Education, University of Wisconsin - School of Medicine and Public Health
I am passionate and continuously curious about how we interact with each other. My research focuses on teaching skills that cultivate empathy and combat shame.
avatar for Kurt Squire

Kurt Squire

full professor, uw-madison
avatar for Constance Steinkuehler

Constance Steinkuehler

Co-Director, Associate Professor, GLS, UW-Madison
Constance Steinkuehler is an Associate Professor in Digital Media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and co-directs the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery and chairs their annual GLS Conference. Her research is on cognition and learning in commercial entertainment games and games designed for impact. In 2011-2012, she served as Senior Policy Analyst in the White House Office of... Read More →
avatar for Peter Stidwill

Peter Stidwill

Executive Producer, Learning Games Network
I create educational games and digital learning products. I'm Executive Producer at the Learning Games Network, a non-profit spin-off of the MIT Education Arcade and the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Games+Learning+Society program. I produced the award-winning ethical-thinking game ‘Quandary’, and am now working on ‘Playful Learning’, an initiative to catalyze the use of game based learning in schools. I previously worked at the... Read More →
avatar for Greg Vaughan

Greg Vaughan

Lead Software Engineer, Learning Games Network


Friday June 14, 2013 10:00am - 1:00pm
Tripp Commons

10:30am

State of the Field

You know what we need?@?#!!  We need vision agendas, honeypots, neurotherapuetics, more stars, practice-based behavior change for schoolwork, and games for everyone...

You know the problem with talks? They're usually canned stuff the speaker has been "working" on for months and probably delivered 10 other times over the past year.  You know what's great about fireside chats?  The speaker can't do this.  We can talk about the more emergent ideas the speaker has, the things they're likely to be thinking about NOW, that are likely more opinionated and not refined to the point of almost being conventional and dull.

Ben Sawyer has been involved in the use of games beyond entertainment since 1999.  We asked him for a title and he sent through a stream of consciousness stitched into a title.  He promises the result will be an original, opinionated, and useful discussion to anyone working on games for education, productivity, health and other large-scale national challenges.


Speaker
avatar for Ben Sawyer

Ben Sawyer

Co-Founder, Digitalmill
Games for Health


Friday June 14, 2013 10:30am - 11:00am
Capitol View

10:30am

Gendered Play

This individual papers session, ”Gendered Play”, will include the following:

Gameplay Enjoyment, Gender, and 19 Individual Characteristics More Influential than Gender
As the field of game studies matures and the scientific understanding of players and the gameplay experience grows, it becomes ever more necessary for games scholars to refine the manner in which they approach research. Although observable differences between players may appear to exist along gendered lines, empirical evidence has not been so conclusive. Following a survey of the gameplay preferences, gaming goal orientations, and play habits of 301 participants, a stepwise regression analysis was undertaken to examine gender alongside several other potential predictors of gameplay enjoyment. In the end, gender did not prove to be a substantial predictor of gameplay enjoyment, while gaming goal orientations were the strongest predictors. The results of this study point to several promising variables that should be considered in continued research. Furthermore, this study reaffirms the need for games scholars to focus towards detailed individual characteristics that can provide deep insights into player experiences.
John Quick, Robert Atkinson

Game Guise: Analyzing Hierarchical Heterosexual Masculinity and Its Effects in Game Spaces
This paper seeks to discover how the use of heterosexual hierarchical masculinity as a tool for domination might affect younger players’ abilities to learn in Team Fortress Two, and what implications these barriers to learning might have in school settings. Game interactions were observed using YouTube clips, noting in particular the use of satire and ostracism by older members against younger members as an attempt to eliminate younger players from the game space. Results indicated that older adolescents utilize heterosexual masculinity to ostracize younger players from the game space, often by feminizing the victim based on childlike appearances, and asserting their own heterosexuality and dominance by undermining the masculinity of younger players.
Keari Bell-Gawne

The Mangle of Play and Gender: Teaching Gamers about Gender and Gaming
For those of us who teach university courses on games and game design, gender and gaming can be a tricky topic. Many students in such courses are avid gamers, and they can bring strong opinions about male and female gamers, as well as about the gendered content of game play. The significance of gender in gaming still is debated; girls and women are playing games in growing numbers, while stereotypes about female gamers continue to flourish. Scholarship on gender and gaming offers multiple and conflicting perspectives, typically focusing on the exclusion or stereotyping of women while leaving dominant tropes of masculinity in games unexamined. I will describe various strategies for "unpacking" the significance of gender in gaming in the context of university courses and raise questions about their impact on students' understanding, with the goal of stimulating conversation about how and why gender matters in the education of gamers.
Betty Hayes


Mary Flanagan, Discussant


Discussants
MF

Mary Flanagan

Mary Flanagan is an award winning game designer and author of Critical Play: Radical Game Design (2009, MIT Press). Flanagan pushes the boundaries of medium and genre across writing, visual arts, and design to innovate in these fields with her 'critical play'-centered approach. She researches and creates games at Tiltfactor, the theory/practice laboratory she founded in 2003 directed at social change play. Tiltfactor... Read More →

Speaker
avatar for Dr. Robert Atkinson

Dr. Robert Atkinson

Associate Professor, Arizona State University
avatar for Keari Bell-Gawne

Keari Bell-Gawne

Research, Games Learning Society
I'm passionate about connecting new paradigms of learning to the environmental movement. How might unique characteristics about games (e.g. massively multiplayer, modding, immersion) be harnessed in a way to better understand, and say new things about the state of human interaction with the environment? I am also immensely passionate about gender, race and sexuality. How are these constructed and maintained in game spaces? How do game spaces... Read More →
avatar for Betty Hayes

Betty Hayes

professor, Arizona State University
Betty is currently on the faculty at Arizona State University and holds the Delbert and Jewell Lewis Chair in Reading & Literacy. She was a founding member of the GLS group while she was on the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and loves to come back to Madison to participate in this fabulous conference. Betty has had a long-standing interest in women, gaming, and the development of computational fluency. Her current work focuses on... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2013 10:30am - 11:30am
Beefeaters

10:30am

Interest

This individual papers session, ”Interest”, will include the following:

Interest in Citizen Science
Because video games are widely played, inherently systemic, and show potential as educational tools, they may be especially useful in widespread science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education (Mayo, 2009). However, video games may promote interest in content areas evenly, particularly amongst captive audiences in formal education settings. In order to better measure interest development related to game play, this study begins the process of developing a valid interest survey for the educational science game Citizen Science. Preliminary results are presented and discussed.
Matthew Gaydos, Amanda Barany, Kurt Squire

Using Video Games to Trigger Interest Emergence and Task Engagement in Science Classrooms
Interest is a powerful predictor of subsequent academic motivation and success, and behavioral psychologists and teachers alike have struggled to find the best method of getting students excited and engaged in classroom activities (Hidi & Harackiewicz, 2000). The current study proposes that video games are an excellent vehicle for producing an initial trigger to allow interest formation to take place. By using the educational video game Virulent in a 7th grade science classroom, it was demonstrated that in-class educational video game play led to higher task involvement for a science-based learning activity, as well as greater levels of interest, enjoyment, and free-time media use, when compared to a more traditional reading assignment. Methodological shortcomings of the present study and future direction of the research are discussed.
Stefan Slater, Shannon Harris

Order Versus Entropy in Virtual Spaces: Takeaways from Three Experiments in Virtual Behavior
This presentation summarizes the results of three experiments on how users behave in open virtual environments with varying degrees of guidance. The goal is to provide information about how to best keep users engaged with the instructional content, rather than the environment itself. The three studies summarized here used Grand Theft Auto games with modified graphics and/or rules, and measured subject reactions. The first study asked subjects to take the role of a firefighter to test adherence to research instructions against the temptation of virtual experimentation. The second study was similar, and tested adherence to an easier, yet tedious task. The third study had one group of subjects select tasks of varying difficulty on their own while a second group had their tasks selected by the experimenter. The results, framed in current learning theory, provide insight on techniques for getting learners to stay on task in virtual worlds.
Edd Schneider, Tony Betrus

Constance Steinkuehler, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Constance Steinkuehler

Constance Steinkuehler

Co-Director, Associate Professor, GLS, UW-Madison
Constance Steinkuehler is an Associate Professor in Digital Media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and co-directs the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery and chairs their annual GLS Conference. Her research is on cognition and learning in commercial entertainment games and games designed for impact. In 2011-2012, she served as Senior Policy Analyst in the White House Office of... Read More →

Speaker
avatar for Amanda Barany

Amanda Barany

Research Assistant, Games + Learning + Society
Amanda Barany is an undergraduate researcher for Games + Learning + Society and the Wiscosin Institute for Discovery at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her fields of interest include motivation and interest development in educational video games, social work and education among children of low socio-economic statuses, and other research regarding the achievement gap in the United States. Her future career goal involves using educational... Read More →
avatar for Tony Betrus

Tony Betrus

Professor, State University of New York at Potsdam
My bio: Did you catch "this is 40?" That pretty much nails it. | | My passion? Making games, analog or digital. If anybody is working on a game and could use another set of eyes, I'd love to help.
avatar for Edd Schneider

Edd Schneider

Assistant Professor, University of South Florida
My teaching and research interests concern the production, distribution, and use of graphics. User reaction and behavior in interactive environments is one of my areas of focus. I am also interested in analysis of comic books as data.
avatar for Kurt Squire

Kurt Squire

full professor, uw-madison


Friday June 14, 2013 10:30am - 11:30am
Inn Wisconsin

10:30am

The Maker Movement and its Implications for Learning

Symposium:
The Maker movement and its implications for learning

In this panel, we explore the intersection of theories of design and learning with the larger Maker movement -- a fast-growing, emergent form of participatory learning that involves engaging with the arts, engineering, science, and entrepreneurship in a “Do-It-Yourself” manner. Important to the designers of learning environments are the ways in which young makers are working together on large-scale, interest-driven projects with computing at their core. This panel seeks to showcase an emerging body of work at the intersection of education and interest-driven activity from across the United States and point to how this work is transforming our notions of collaboration and learning today. More specifically, we explore Maker activity and evidence of computational literacy and collaborative learning across museums, after-school environments, and hackerspaces and discuss the methodological and design implications of this work.

Erica Halverson, Breanne Litts, Trevor Owens, Kimberly Sheridan, Deborah Fields, Kylie Peppler, Rafi Santo, Yasmin Kafai, Lisa Brahms, Marjorie Bequette


Speaker
avatar for Deborah Fields

Deborah Fields

Independent Research Consultant & Temporary Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital technologies in ways that bridge informal and formal learning contexts. She is the co-PI on the Kids' DIY Media Project (kidsdiymedia.com) aimed at identifying and... Read More →
avatar for Erica Rosenfeld Halverson

Erica Rosenfeld Halverson

Professor of Educational Psychology / Curriculum and Instruction, UW Madison
Erica Halverson is a Professor of Curriculum & Instruction at UW-Madison where she studies how people learn in and through the arts. Erica has worked in a range of arts media including theatre, film, radio, digital art, and most recently, in the emerging Maker Movement. In 2016, Erica co-edited the two volume Makeology (Routledge, 2016), the first volumes dedicated to empirical research on making and makerspaces in education. Erica is the... Read More →
YK

Yasmin Kafai

University of Pennsylvania
Yasmin Kafai is Professor of Learning Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. She is a researcher, designer, and developer of online communities and tools (ecrafting.org, stitchtfest.org, and scratch.mit.edu) to promote computational participation, crafting, and creativity across K-16. Book publications include Connected Code, Connected Play, The Computer Clubhouse, Textile Messages, and Beyond Barbie and Mortal Kombat. Kafai earned a... Read More →
avatar for Breanne Litts

Breanne Litts

University of Wisconsin-Madison
I am a Ph.D. student in Curriculum & Instruction with a Digital Media focus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I currently serve as a project assistant for Dr. Erica Halverson on an NSF funded project researching makerspaces and learning through making. Additionally, I am a researcher in the newly founded Mobile Learning Incubator in Academic Technology at UW-Madison. Broadly, my scholarly interests are focused around the intersection of... Read More →
avatar for Trevor Owens

Trevor Owens

Senior Program Officer, IMLS
Institute of Museum and Library Services
avatar for Kylie Peppler

Kylie Peppler

Assistant Professor, Indiana University
avatar for Rafi Santo

Rafi Santo

Graduate Research Assistant, Indiana University - Learning Sciences
Rafi Santo is a researcher, educator, and designer currently pursuing a doctorate in the Learning Sciences at Indiana University. He is interested in learning, technology, democracy and participatory culture. Rafi’s current work involves using ethnographic approaches to understand diffusion of learning innovations in the Digital Media & Learning field, promoting systems thinking through digital design, and empowering youth in relation to new... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2013 10:30am - 11:30am
Old Madison

10:30am

Come Play with Us! & Tablet Game Early Learning Curric

This working examples session will include the following:

Working Examples: Come Play with Us!
WEx (www.workingexamples.org) is an online community for people who are reimagining education. We like to think of WEx as a sandbox; it’s a community based around building and improving ideas about technology and learning (e.g. games for learning), sharing work-in-progress and meeting new people and perspectives. The workshop will start with an introduction to the site, including an explanation of “working examples” and a quick run through of the site. Next, we’ll touch on some of the core ideas behind the site (collaboration, exploring ideas, and iteration) through a group activity. We’ll wrap up with a discussion about the activity and becoming an integral player in the WEx community. See our working example here!
Jolene Zywica, Eric Keylor, Anna Roberts, Drew Davidson, Jim Gee

The Time a Tablet Game Walked Into an Early-Learning Curriculum Framework
As a worked example, researchers explicate the process of designing a comprehensive early-learning curriculum framework to support a series of tablet-based interactive animated stories, along with a parental feedback loop.  See our working example here!
Jessica Tsang, Dylan Arena


Speaker
avatar for Dylan Arena

Dylan Arena

Co-founder and Chief Learning Scientist, Kidaptive, Inc.
I'm passionate about learning sciences (especially game-based learning, cognitive science, and developmental psychology), software, statistics, games, rugby, and CrossFit. I'm also pretty stoked about early learning and next-generation assessment (areas in which my startup, Kidaptive, is focused).
avatar for Drew Davidson

Drew Davidson

Director, Entertainment Technology Center at CMU
Drew Davidson is a professor, producer and player of interactive media. His background spans academic, industry and professional worlds and he is interested in stories across texts, comics, games and other media. He is the Director of the Entertainment Technology Center at Carnegie Mellon University and the Founding Editor of ETC Press and its Well Played series and journal. All things Drew can be found... Read More →
avatar for James Paul Gee

James Paul Gee

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University
avatar for Anna Roberts

Anna Roberts

Director, Working Examples
I head up Working Examples, an online community built for the re-imaginers of education – people who are using technology to change the future of education. (You know who you are.) The site brings people together to explore ideas, to make things and to impact each other. | | I'm passionate about collaboration and how it affects innovation. There are still big gaps between what's being made and what's being used in classrooms. I believe we... Read More →
avatar for Jolene Zywica

Jolene Zywica

Learning Experience Designer, Opportunity Education


Friday June 14, 2013 10:30am - 11:30am
Class of '24

11:30am

Delicious Snack Break!
Friday June 14, 2013 11:30am - 12:00am
Great Hall

12:00pm

Math Games

This individual papers session, ”Math Games”, will include the following:

Examining a Conceptual vs. a Computational Design on Understanding in an Mathematics Game
This paper examines the effect of different learning mechanics on middle school students’ learning outcomes and motivation in two versions of a mathematics videogame designed to teach the properties of angles. One version was computation-oriented and required players to choose a correct numerical answer that solved an unknown angle. The second version was identical, except that players were required to choose the correct conceptual rule that would apply to finding the solution for an unknown angle. The impact of these two game versions was subsequently analyzed to determine their effect on three dependent variables: learning, motivation, and in-game performance. Results from N=194 sixth and seventh grade students, randomly assigned to play one of the two versions of the game, suggest that the learning mechanics studied affect how much students learn, favoring the computation-oriented game version. Implications of these findings are discussed within the context of educational game design.
Charles Kinzer, Selen Turkay, Dan Hoffman, Dao Chantes

Counting Coconuts and Apples: Young Children ‘Kinect-ing’ Sesame Street and Mathematics
The ability to count objects is a crucial skill for young children. We report on an experimental study that utilized a Kinect Sesame Street TV intervention designed to support two types of counting activities. Our quantitative analysis is supplemented by our preliminary qualitative analyses, and the complexity of these contexts for mathematical learning is unpacked with the assistance of literature from the fields of mathematics education and cognitive science. We conclude by making recommendations for interactive educational design in general.
Meagan Rothschild, Caroline "Caro" Williams, Jordan Thevenow-Harrison

The Pythagorean Temple: Creating a Game-Like Summative Assessment
We work in a middle school where teachers, game designers, and curriculum designers collaborate to create a game-like curriculum that is relevant and engaging while teaching 21st-century skills. As part of our integrated math and English class, eighth grade students attempted to uncover the secrets of an ancient secret society called the Pythagorean Brotherhood, based on a historically real secret society. We decided to make an iPad game that related to the narrative of revealing the secrets of the Pythagorean Brotherhood that we could use as the final assessment of students’ understanding of linear equations and the Pythagorean theorem for the trimester-long mission. In this postmortem of The Pythagorean Temple, we detail our design process, outcomes and next steps that came out of our first attempt at applying game-like learning and our curriculum design model to a digital game-like end-of-trimester performance task.
John Murphy, Grant Tumen

Caro Williams, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Caro Williams-Pierce

Caro Williams-Pierce

University of Wisconsin-Madison
Caro's a PhD candidate in Mathematics Education at UW-Madison, and heading off in the fall to the University at Albany, SUNY, to build more math education games. Her dissertation involved building a fractions game in LittleBigPlanet 2, and evaluating shifts in understanding reversible multiplicative relationships as a result of playing the game. These days, her hair is less marigold and more aquamarine/lavender (it's Conor's fault).

Speaker
avatar for John Murphy

John Murphy

Game Designer, ChicagoQuest Schools
I'm a game designer. I work out of ChicagoQuest's Mission Lab, where I design game-based learning materials and experiences. I'm also working on Octodad: Dadliest Catch with Young Horses, an indie game studio that I co-founded. I was Executive Producer for Octodad, a 2011 Independent Games Festival Student Showcase Winner. My interests include educational games, art games, abusive games, persuasive games, and a lot of things that aren’t... Read More →
avatar for Meagan Rothschild

Meagan Rothschild

Early Education Assessment and Design Specialist, WIDA
Kids, play, learning, media, music, general silliness.
GT

Grant Tumen

Game Designer, ChicagoQuest Schools
I am a game designer. I am currently working as a game designer at ChicagoQuest where I create game-based materials and experiences to be used in the classroom and help design curriculum. I received a B.A. in Digital Media Studies with a minor in Computer Science at the University of Denver in 2011. My interests include all games, 2D/3D art and animation, photography, interactive media, and improv. I enjoy (non-criminally)hacking preexisting... Read More →
avatar for Selen Turkay

Selen Turkay

Games 4 Learning Institute


Friday June 14, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Inn Wisconsin

12:00pm

Mobile Theory and Design

This individual papers session, ”Mobile Theory and Design”, will include the following:

Situated learning and mobile technologies: Connecting theory to design
In recent years, mobile devices have become ubiquitous across our everyday lives and are seeping into informal and formal educational settings. As a response, scholars, educators, and game designers alike have begun to explore mobile platforms as educational tools. In this paper, we hope to provide a vocabulary and framework for this exploration. Our goals are twofold: 1) to consider the design of mobile activities in terms of theories of learning, mapping mechanics on a theoretical platform, and 2) offer a framework to inform future learning design with mobile technologies. We hope this paper adds to the discussion around mobile learning in providing a broad theoretically-driven survey of the landscape.
Breanne Litts, Garrett Smith, David Gagnon, John Martin, Jim Mathews

Augmented Reality Games in Education
Augmented reality technology is a powerful tool for student learning that is made even more effective through the interactivity of games. This paper compares six case studies that exemplify the medium’s educational strengths, each representing a different method of interacting with augmented reality technology. Best practices for using augmented reality games to teach abstract concepts (by visualizing arithmetic), scientific inquiry skills (by diagnosing a failing ecosystem), design thinking (by planning a city), and creativity (by creating a game) are also discussed. However, inadequate research, limited teacher training, and the challenge of obtaining funding for new equipment pose challenges to implementing this new technology in schools. Until augmented reality becomes more commonplace outside of schools, its impact on formal education will be limited.
Deidre Witan

Playtesting PlanetMania: A Mobile Game for Museum Exhibits
PlanetMania is a mobile game designed to be played by visitors to the Maryland Science Center's new Life Beyond Earth exhibit. Intended for preteens, the card-based gameplay expands upon exhibit content and encourages interaction with the physical exhibit. Through extensive playtesting and iterative development, the project team revised and simplified the game content and interactivity, striving for intuitive game rules, age-appropriate scientific content, and engaging game play and learning outcomes — all in a museum environment where players have plenty of distractions. This presentation offers an inside look at the PlanetMania game development, revealing the ways that project constraints helped shaped the game format, the benefits and drawbacks of paper prototyping such a game, and the merits of a generic game design that can be repurposed for exhibits on other topics.
David Schaller, Barbara Flagg

Kurt Squire, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Kurt Squire

Kurt Squire

full professor, uw-madison

Speaker
avatar for David Gagnon

David Gagnon

Director, Field Day Lab, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I have a sweet spot for directing small design teams to approach big challenges. I like thinking and making real world products that are inspired by all the cool stuff kids like these days. I love seeing other people find themselves by making something new. I also am a bit of a baking addict, still trying to nail the traditional sour dough baguette in a wood fired oven.
avatar for Breanne Litts

Breanne Litts

University of Wisconsin-Madison
I am a Ph.D. student in Curriculum & Instruction with a Digital Media focus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I currently serve as a project assistant for Dr. Erica Halverson on an NSF funded project researching makerspaces and learning through making. Additionally, I am a researcher in the newly founded Mobile Learning Incubator in Academic Technology at UW-Madison. Broadly, my scholarly interests are focused around the intersection of... Read More →
avatar for John Martin

John Martin

Learning Consultant, UW-Madison
Integrating technology to increase learning in higher education in various roles since 1998, John currently teaches and develops socioculturally-rich teaching and learning practices at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His doctoral research in Curriculum and Instruction broadly considered the learning affordances of video games, and specifically focused on learner-designed place-based mobile games. Drawing on a background and interest in... Read More →
avatar for Jim Mathews

Jim Mathews

Field Day Lab, UW Madison
Jim Mathews is a teacher, researcher, and designer, exploring the intersection of place, design, and civic engagement. Through his work with the Field Day Lab, he designs and researches digital media and learning experiences aimed at connecting youth and adults with their local community. He also has fifteen+ years experience as a teacher in a variety of formal and informal educational settings.
avatar for David Schaller

David Schaller

Principal, Eduweb
Dave Schaller has been a media developer since first picking up a Super-8 camera in the third grade. Twenty-five years later, he founded eduweb to develop digital learning games and interactives and embark on the perpetual quest for the sweet spot where learning theory, digital media, and fun meet. For nearly on twenty years, he has led the development of award-winning media projects for museums and educational organizations around the country... Read More →
avatar for Deidre Witan

Deidre Witan

I am an educator and instructional designer, specializing in the use of new technologies to create innovative solutions to educational challenges. My interests include educational game design and mobile app development for informal learning. I have worked with the MIT Education Arcade and Learning Games Network to help bring more educational video games into K12 classrooms. Currently, I'm designing an interactive tool to for a "flipped classroom... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Beefeaters

12:00pm

Pro-Social

This individual papers session, ”Pro-Social”, will include the following:

Investigating a Supportive Online Gaming Community as a Means of Reducing Stereotype Threat Vulnerability Across Gender
We explore the relationship between online gaming communities (which literature shows act as informal learning environments) and experience in game culture, which has been shown to be inequitable, harassing and otherwise unsupportive to certain players, like females. Specifically, this study explores the experiences of gamers in gaming clans, both explicitly gender supportive and not, to see if they can serve as protective spaces for vulnerable players. Ultimately, the goal is to inform the design of equitable gaming environments.
Gabriela Richard, Christopher Hoadley

Tunnel Tail: Successful game developer-educator collaboration
This paper describes the development process for Tunnel Tail, a game developed in tandem by a traditional game studio and nonprofit organizations, and released in 2012. Two factors condition the game design: the educational goals and the caveat that the target audience responds negatively to any heavy handed attempts at education through games. By employing their expertise, the companies are able to come up with a solution that satisfies the educational and game design goals. This paper explains the approach taken, why it worked for the parties involved, what were the risks associated with it and when and how to adopt a similar approach.
Francisco Souki

Life Imitates Art:  Embodying Focused Attention and Pro-Social Behavior in the Tenacity Project Collaboration
Educators have long been concerned with not only the development and transmission of knowledge in the classroom, but also in the social and moral development of children (Noddings, 2002).  Educational researchers are beginning to explore how the use of games can facilitate these many domains of learning.  To this end, the Games+Learning+Society center has joined in collaboration with the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds in a project called Tenacity.   A major goal of this project was to build games to cultivate skills in 8th grade students to prepare them for high school and college success (rooted in attention training derived from contemplative practices,  empathy, and compassion).  The work pivots around the development of two iPad games: Tenacity, a game cultivating the self-regulation of focused attention using breath counting; and Crystals of Kaydor, an RPG designed to cultivate the development of pro-social behavior, particularly sensitivity to the non-verbal communication of others and skill at collaborative, cooperative and kind social interactions. In the latter, learning objectives such as the accurate identification of emotions from facial expressions and choosing the most productive responses to these emotions (e.g. Ekman, 2007) have been interwoven into a virtual landscape in which players most complete missions to assist the native population and eventually be able to return to her/his home planet.   Creating both of these games was a wonderfully rich collaborative process of connecting the practice of breath awareness & pro-social content to data-driven iterative game design.   The next phase of our collaborative work entails a rigorous examination of the neural and behavioral changes produced by playing each of these games over the course of a two-week period.  This paper provides an account -- as well as emergent best-practices  -- of the cross-disciplinary work done in the Tenacity project to connect the power of attention, learning, and games.  
Mike Beall, V. Elizabeth Owen, Stefan Slater, Amy Smith, Enrique Solis, Constance Steinkuehler, Richard J. Davidson


Bob Coulter, Discussant


Discussants
avatar for Bob Coulter

Bob Coulter

Director, Litzsinger Road Ecology Center (Missouri Botanical Garden)
I spend most of my time thinking about ways to get kids excited about learning and taking action in the community. A good part of this involves games they design with MIT's Taleblazer and StarLogo Nova tools, or in playing Equations, a really cool math game.

Speaker
avatar for Mike Beall

Mike Beall

Project Leader, Learning Games Network
I am a Game Designer, Project Leader, and Artist working with the Learning Games Network and Games Learning Society. In addition to direct involvement with design and development of many GLS/LGN games, I also work with local schools and community centers where I engage with University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty and students to conduct playtests, interviews, and focus group tests.
avatar for Richard J Davidson

Richard J Davidson

William James and Vilas Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Dr Davidson's research is broadly focused on the neural bases of emotion and emotional style and methods to promote human flourishing including meditation and related contemplative practices. His studies have included persons of all ages from birth though old age and have also included individuals with disorders of emotion such as mood and anxiety disorders and autism, as well as expert meditation practitioners with tens of thousands of hours of... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Owen

Elizabeth Owen

Director, Learning & Data Science, Age of Learning
Elizabeth Owen holds a PhD in Digital Media (School of Education) from UW-Madison, focused on game-based learning analytics. Currently the Director of Learning and Data Science at Age of Learning, she's committed to optimizing adaptive learning systems through applied machine learning. Previously a researcher and data scientist with GlassLab Games (EA campus), LRNG, and Metacog, her doctoral work is rooted at the Games+Learning+Society Center... Read More →
avatar for Gabriela Richard

Gabriela Richard

Doctoral Candidate, New York University
Gabriela Richard is a doctoral candidate and adjunct instructor at NYU whose research focuses on understanding the intersection between culture, experience, media and learning. She is currently completing her doctorate in the Educational Communication and Technology program. Her dissertation looks at the ways in which gender, ethnicity and sexuality are promoted, experienced, reflected, reenacted, and redefined in game culture by the various... Read More →
AS

Amy Smith

Curriculum Designer and PhD Candidate in School of Education, University of Wisconsin - School of Medicine and Public Health
I am passionate and continuously curious about how we interact with each other. My research focuses on teaching skills that cultivate empathy and combat shame.
avatar for Constance Steinkuehler

Constance Steinkuehler

Co-Director, Associate Professor, GLS, UW-Madison
Constance Steinkuehler is an Associate Professor in Digital Media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and co-directs the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery and chairs their annual GLS Conference. Her research is on cognition and learning in commercial entertainment games and games designed for impact. In 2011-2012, she served as Senior Policy Analyst in the White House Office of... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Old Madison

12:00pm

Building a Field

This working examples session, ”Building a Field”, will include the following:

Collaboration in Context: A Working Example for Connecting University Stakeholders in Digital Media & Learning
Research and teaching concerning Digital Media & Learning (DML) should not be the sole responsibility of one university department or program. Developing effective programs must be a partnership between various stakeholders seeking to design coursework, spaces for interaction, and collaborative projects. Recognizing that the undertaking must acknowledge individual situations and contexts, we explore the viability of our collaborative, interdisciplinary venture to build a comprehensive DML program at a traditional university. Research, models of DML across the country, previous experience integrating digital media for learning, and consciously navigating the reality of culture, policies, and challenges in education informs our work. In this working example we detail the existing structures, institutional offerings, nurtured relationships, challenges and early successes from our endeavor. We invite critique and scholarly conversation towards considering similar models across institutions, disciplines, and settings.
D. Matthew Boyer, Danielle Herro, Shaundra B. Daily, Juan E. Gilbert

Creating a Collaborative Online Resource for Integrating Videogames in to the Composition Classroom
In fall 2012, I developed the first draft of a website on methods for integrating videogames into first year composition classrooms. By creating a taxonomy of methods and by reflecting on a collection of lesson plans, the website is designed to help instructors explore the range of possibilities for this technique. The ultimate goal, however, is to create a model for pedagogical collaboration networks. In this paper, I discuss both the content and building process of the site.
Luke Thominet


Speaker
avatar for Matthew Boyer

Matthew Boyer

Assistant Professor, Clemson University
assistant professor of digital media & learning in the eugene t. moore school of education at clemson university
avatar for Juan E. Gilbert

Juan E. Gilbert

Presidential Endowed Professor and Chair, Human-Centered Computing Division, Clemson University
avatar for Dani Herro

Dani Herro

Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Learning, Clemson University
I am a former Instructional Technology Administrator and K-12 Technology Resource Teacher. My PhD work at UW-Madison involved studying teen learning using games and Web 2.0 apps. My current research involves writing and studying game and app design curricula in "formal" schooling, and computational thinking practices in teens designing apps. I love working with teachers and kids connecting technology to learning.
avatar for Luke Thominet

Luke Thominet

Graduate Teaching Assistant, Wayne State University


Friday June 14, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Class of '24

1:00pm

Lunch
Friday June 14, 2013 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Great Hall

2:00pm

What Videogames Have to Teach Us Ten Years Later
Discussants
avatar for Richard Halverson

Richard Halverson

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I'm a Professor at UW-Madison, and I study how technologies can and do transform teaching and learning in and out of schools. I work with the Wisconsin Collaborative Education Research Network (the Network); the Collaborative Assessment of Leadership for Learning project, and the Games, Learning and Society Research Center.

Speaker
avatar for James Paul Gee

James Paul Gee

Tempe, Arizona, USA, Arizona State University


Friday June 14, 2013 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Great Hall

3:00pm

Award Ceremony
The first annual GLS Conference Award Ceremony!  Our very own ninja 3D printing and design team will co-present our playful and interactive awards with the chairs and curators of the following events:  Poster Session, Games & Art Exhibit, and Educational Game Arcade.  Awards will include People's Choice and Judge's Choice (and a special Playful Learning award!).  

Presenters:
Arnold Martin, Don Davis, & Matthew Berland (designers and builders of the GLS awards)
Gabriella Anton (chair of the Poster Session)
Mark Riechers & Arnold Martin (co-curators of the Games & Art Exhibit)
Wade Berger (chair of the Educational Game Arcade) 
Remi Holden (chair of the GLS Playful Learning Summit)

Moderator:
Constance Steinkuehler 

Discussants
avatar for Constance Steinkuehler

Constance Steinkuehler

Co-Director, Associate Professor, GLS, UW-Madison
Constance Steinkuehler is an Associate Professor in Digital Media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and co-directs the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery and chairs their annual GLS Conference. Her research is on cognition and learning in commercial entertainment games and games designed for impact. In 2011-2012, she served as Senior Policy Analyst in the White House Office of... Read More →

Speaker
avatar for Gabriella Anton

Gabriella Anton

Research Specialist, Games Learning Society Center
Gabriella Anton graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with two bachelor's degrees in Psychology and Sociology in 2011. She worked in an independent Montessori school as a teaching assistant for 5 years throughout high school and college. She currently works at the Center for Games+Learning+Society designing and implementing a video game design curriculum, as well as studying how adults learn computational thinking and modeling.
avatar for Wade Berger

Wade Berger

Graduate Student Research Assistant, University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Matthew Berland

Matthew Berland

University of Wisconsin–Madison
avatar for Remi Holden

Remi Holden

GLS Playful Learning Summit Co-Chair, University of Colorado Denver
avatar for Mark Riechers

Mark Riechers

Freelance writer and photographer
Freelance writer, semi-professional nerd. Lover of films, games, TV and technology. Photographer and art show coordinator for GLS 9.0. Boston terrier papa.


Friday June 14, 2013 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Great Hall

3:30pm

Closing Remarks
Closing Remarks will be a town-hall style discussion and reflection, focusing on where we are as a field (and a conference!), and our next steps moving forward.  Constance Steinkuehler will moderate, with Q&A and comments welcomed.  

In addition, Jen Groff gives closing remarks for the Playful Learning Initiative, unveiled during the GLS Playful Learning Summit, and Constance Steinkuehler gives closing remarks for GLS proper.  It's been another wonderful year, folks--and now it's time for Brats & Beer!  

Speaker
avatar for Jen Groff

Jen Groff

VP of Learning & Program Development, Learning Games Network
learning, design, design for learning, assessment, education, systems, system dynamics, policy, learning environments, curriculum
avatar for Constance Steinkuehler

Constance Steinkuehler

Co-Director, Associate Professor, GLS, UW-Madison
Constance Steinkuehler is an Associate Professor in Digital Media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and co-directs the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery and chairs their annual GLS Conference. Her research is on cognition and learning in commercial entertainment games and games designed for impact. In 2011-2012, she served as Senior Policy Analyst in the White House Office of... Read More →


Friday June 14, 2013 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Great Hall

4:00pm

Beer & Brats on Terrace
Friday June 14, 2013 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Union Terrace